Agents with open books

  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Hi Guys and Girls,

    Wonder if you can give me some answers to this.... I have submitted my details to agents via the "Agents with open books" section. They have all stayed as "Waiting for feedback". Should I re-send my details as its been a while?

    Thank you -x-

    • 28th Feb 2014
    • 12437
    • 13
  • Jenna Sharpe

    Actor

    Hi Nikki

    Nice to see a fellow Berkshire based actor on here!

    I would say don't contact them again via CCP.

    There could be a variety of reasons why it says 'waiting for feedback', i.e. some may have looked at what you sent and others may not. I think the "feedback" you get is either they call you or it just says "not interested"! I think sending things again may annoy them as you can imagine how many submissions they must get.

    I would say if there is a particular agency you are interested in then write to them personally by mail. I think a letter always has more of an impact than an electronic submission and people are more likely to open it (especially if you address it to the right person).

    Good luck!

    Jen

    • 27th Aug 2009
    • 1
  • Nigel Peever

    Actor

    I think waiting for feedback after a while means hasn't got the time to say no.

    • 27th Aug 2009
    • 2
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Hi Guys,

    Thank you for all your comments -xx-

    • 28th Aug 2009
    • 3
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I dont know if im breaking any rules by putting this here, but can I just ask..... What should you write in the covering letter submitted through CCP for agents with open books? Should it differ to that of applying off your own back?

    • 28th Aug 2009
    • 4
  • Kali Hughes

    Actor

    I'm pretty certain the agents with open books remain on the CCP list even long after their books have closed again and they're no longer receiving submissions. So, there is no guarantee they're reading your letters at all.

    These agents are listed alphabetically and not in order of when they announced their books being open so finding the current and valid ones is a bit of a lottery.

    Better to directly approach the agents you have your sights set on and hopefully invite them along to a show you might be doing, I think.

    • 29th Aug 2009
    • 5
  • Mark Kempner

    Actor

    Just to put a different slant on this....!

    Most agents usualy tell you their books are closed or full. However, if you have something to offer which they like and or need....you're in!

    So my advice would be not to just stick to the agents telling you their books are open...but pick a few sucsessful agents who would be good for you...and sell yourself well to them first. Start big...not too big though....and work your way down would be my approach!

    Arm yourself with a decent showreel and a CV and good Picture...a decent concise and honest letter....and go for it.

    Good luck.

    • 29th Aug 2009
    • 6
  • Lee Ravitz

    Actor

    Kali's point is right...inasmuch as I assume it is up to the agency concerned to declare to CCP that their books are closed in order that the moderators can update the status. CCP cannot assume any different themselves until they have been notified. Either that, or the agencies will alter their own details.

    And I agree that it is possible that they have posted an initial request to CCP some months ago, forgotten to rescind it, and yet the request still stands. Like everything else on CCP, it can pay dividends to keep an eagle eye on the listings for *new* additions (e.g. check them diligently once a day) and write off to the appropriate agency within a day or two of the posting - this guarantees that you know the request is current.

    With that said, I would still have thought if agencies had closed their books, and were finding their inboxes clogged with unwanted application mails from CCP servers, they might conclude that they needed to log back in and alter their status.

    Still, striking whilst the iron is hot is useful also because it flags you up to the agency at a point before they have been inudated with suggested clients (hopefully) - you are therefore probably more likely to secure consideration and an interview if you move quickly, whereas you may lose out if the agency already feel they have arranged to see three other people who fit your type, and will take one, by the time you apply - they will have no need to even take your application into account because they feel they have the bases covered.

    • 30th Aug 2009
    • 7
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Just wondering what people's thoughts are on sending a copy of your showreel with your initial contact with an agent.

    Having a discussion with a friend who puts, showreel available and waits for a request. Where I'd just send it, than hope it's requested.

    Sure, you end up spending more money, but if you're doing a targeted mailing, I'd think it's worth it.

    Any thoughts...

    • 30th Aug 2009
    • 8
  • James Abbey

    Actor

    I agree with Mark in that an agents books are never really closed. If you have something to offer sell it. Also on the question of should you send your showreel with the first correspondence then I would say yes. Its simple and we dont need correspondence going back and forth. Sometimes you will send it to people, never hear anything from them and never see the showreel again. How much does it cost to make a copy of your showreel? blank dvd's aren't expensive and if it is in an electronic format it can be made with very little difficulty.

    • 30th Aug 2009
    • 9
  • Jenna Sharpe

    Actor

    I do think there is an element of luck involved. However, it does surprise me how many people on this site have had trouble finding an agent. And this is not directed at Nikki but a general observation I have made.

    Why does it surprise me?

    a) Because there are SO MANY AGENTS around.

    b) Because there are so many talentless people WITH agents

    c) You look at their resumes and think, well you have clearly done some work, you have some training, some good headshots... what could be the problem?

    I believe a lot of it comes down to what you write in your letters. Letter writing is a science and an art and one that doesn't really get taught these days.

    The key is to get the balance right between sounding enthusiastic but not desperate! Find your strength as an actor and sell yourself. Say how you can help them make money! Say why you like their agency in particular (e.g. perhaps you know of someone already in the agency and they recommended it to you.) If you have reviews of your work, put them in but these should be proper reviews e.g. from papers, magazines, reputable internet sites and not those annoying testimonial quotes "Jenna was a pleasure to work with on the set blah blah blah". I hate those so much lol.

    Do not under estimate the importance of

    presentation and attention to detail. This is why I think a letter is so much better than an online application.

    I started acting last year with no formal training, no show reel, just ambition, some headshots and a bit of experience. I wrote to 3 or four agencies and after an audition I got accepted to 2 of them.

    I am not bragging, I just think I approached it like a business/marketing person as opposed to a struggling actor! I turned my weaknesses into my strengths.

    Granted I didn't write to the top tier agents but there is something to be said for starting with a smaller one as you won't get ignored in favour of big names.

    If you are getting seen/auditioned by agents and are still not getting any luck then it is time to ask yourself some difficult questions about how well you present, choice of monologue and maybe even your talent. Harsh but true.

    There are so many actors out there that just shouldn't be acting and those people make it harder for the people that do have talent to be noticed, but I believe eventually talent does rise to the top and is noticed. You just have to do what you can to stack the cards in your favour. :)

    • 30th Aug 2009
    • 10
  • Stuart Hough

    Actor

    Reply 7

    Mark i thought you advice here was concise and I completely agree. If you have something to offer, an agents books are always open. Showreels for me are vital tools in representing yourself.

    • 9th Jan 2014
    • 11
  • Catherine Stobbs

    Actor

    You can't apply more than once in 2 years via CCP anyway.

    If they are interested they will get in touch. Personally I only use CCP as a guide and check each agents website for advice on how the prefer to receive applications.

    Good Luck

    • 9th Jan 2014
    • 12
  • Jensen Freeman

    Actor

    An up to date CV, clear professional headshot the accurately represents you, and a link to your showreel is more than sufficient.

    • 28th Feb 2014
    • 13