Does this happen to anyone else ?

  • Tom Clear

    Actor

    I have sent out a mail out to a few agents, done it all professional with a headshot, cv, show reel, cover letter and stamped address envelope,

    and a couple have come back, clear they do not want me on their books but they do not even have a simple letter saying who it is from ?? just the headshot or wht ever thrown back into the envelope. Think I have to but a number on my stamped address envelops in future just so I know who it is from?? does anyone else have this and do they think it is a bit rude??

    • 27th Feb 2012
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  • Dave Frost

    Actor

    I guess they could have thrown a comp slip in saying briefly why, but I suspect they receive a fair amount of submissions and would rather be finding work for their actors, as would you if you were on their books.

    So I guess not rude, just part and parcel of our career. Good idea numbering the SAE's though!

    • 16th Nov 2011
    • 1
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    The majority of your applications to agencies will remain unanswered. There will be just silence. Don't take it personally, it's just part of the business, hence our actor's necessity to grow a very thick skin.

    • 16th Nov 2011
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  • Forbes KB

    Actor

    Part and parcel of the job! Sometimes you get a "thanks but no thanks", sometimes it's simply sent back in the SAE, sometimes it disappears into the ethyr!

    One things for certain though and that's that you will never ever get any response unless you write to them in the first place! Gotta be in it to win it so to speak!

    A thick skin and solid determination to succeed are definately worth way more than any form of training!

    • 16th Nov 2011
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  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I once had an agent cut my photo up so it would fit in the envelope I enclosed which was actually just meant for a reply letter! I'm afraid we have to get used to such things!

    • 16th Nov 2011
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  • David Vaughan Knight

    Actor

    Yes this has happened to me in the past too. Although it came as no surprise and certainly didn't bother me.

    I was told this would happen, amongst other things, during my training.

    • 17th Nov 2011
    • 5
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    When I've done mailshots I've always written the name of the CD/agent and the month/year on the return envelope because you're right, you might have no idea who has replied. I found this very useful

    • 17th Nov 2011
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  • Dan Gregory

    Actor

    A few years back I was in the junk room of the well-known regional theatre I was working in. I had been told I'd find some old scripts in there. Not only did I find a few useful scripts but also discovered a three foot high pile of Photos, Letters, and SAEs in the corner. Just thrown there, some seemingly unopened.

    • 17th Nov 2011
    • 7
  • Tom Clear

    Actor

    Cheers Everyone for replying :D it is interesting to hear other people's views and story's on this subject!! helped a lot :D

    • 17th Nov 2011
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  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    A director friend of mine once rang me as he was casting for 7 people and had 250 cv's on his doormat (before the internet really took hold) and had seen I had directed one of the actors, wanted to know what I thought of them.

    My agent says she gets stacks of applications on a daily basis and she does (eventually) answer them all, but it takes a long time. It really is a case of luck that your cv and photo lands on on a desk at the precise moment they are looking for someone just like you

    Try not to take it personally, and try to write to people when you are in something that they could potentially come and see, they might be interested but need to see you in action. Show reel is obviously good too

    Keep fighting the fight x

    • 17th Nov 2011
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  • Robert Wedig

    Actor

    hey Tom, just wanted to add to all of the great comments. I've experienced the same thing on previous occasions and I think the reason behind it is to send the message that at the moment they're not interested and don't want additional follow up. In other words, if they send the stuff right back, you won't call, email or write back to them wondering what their position is. It leaves no uncertainty. Brutal, but the reality of the business. Just keep pushing. I think Forbes KB summed it up best- determination is the most important thing in this business. Heed his advice, the guy works constantly in proper TV and film projects- IMDB him. I'm at the point now where I have a very good agent and have gone up for big projects with great feedback from casting directors, but still coming up short at the moment- and you get no feedback from producers or final decision makers. Just have to accept it and move on.

    • 18th Nov 2011
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  • Simon Burbage

    Actor

    I may be going out on a limb here, but...

    I've experienced this, and think it bad mannered. If I can dedicate; time to writing a strong letter, money to a decent printers, plus postage for an sae, then I think in a business sense it's reasonable to expect a reply. Even a generic letter awkwardly photocopied is gratefully received for filing purposes.

    Im suprised more of you don't feel the same! Please let me know if you think I'm presumptuous in expecting more...

    Best,

    Simon

    • 19th Nov 2011
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  • David Vaughan Knight

    Actor

    At the end of the day we are a product, our own product. Sending out mailshots to Agents or CD,s or auditions is done to essentially, generate sales of our product. A mailshot binned or returned is still a no sale.

    I agree a returned photo is helpful economically and shows a respect and understanding from the addresee.

    But lets be honest, how many of us are going to run to our front door today. Gather up all the mailshots and sit down and politely reply to them all, thanks but no thanks.

    • 19th Nov 2011
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  • Lee Ravitz

    Actor

    I thought I replied to this thread already (it must have been one of those replies I got bored with and deleted before I sent it!).

    In response to Simon: I do think it unprofessional not to include a compliments slip. It's just...unprofessional, no two ways about it. It surely takes all of two seconds to place a pre-prepared compliments slip into the envelope you are sending off, anyway - that's why you have them made up generically - to save time on sending out letters. The only thing *not* sending a compliments slip equates to in my book is the suggestion that the agency aren't professional enough/are too skinflint to print up compliment slips...and that may well be true, and reflect very badly on them *as an agency*. I suppose it might get missed, on occasion, or lost in the bottom of the envelope. But honestly...

    With that said, I don't necessarily expect anything *more* than a compliments slip back: it may be impolite not to send an appreciative letter, but we live in an age that *is* hugely impolite, in every walk of life, and judging what an agency office should be doing by the standards of forty years ago doesn't cut a lot of ice - *their* argument would surely be: they could afford to reply to everyone individually forty years ago because there were a lot less actors, then. And, you know, they might have a point.

    The thing that does make me smile, and irk me, in about equal measure is the notion that you include an SAE generally when you would like your headshot back in order that you can reuse it, and that, theoretically, at least, is why they get sent back to you if the office doesn't wish to place the shot on file. Of course, vast numbers of your photos are sent back in unusable forms: creased, smudged, or frequently bearing the tear where they've had to rip out the staple that you used to attach it to the CV. You might as well have just left out the SAE and told them to chuck the photo if they weren't interested. But then, the real reason they tend to send headshots back is so they don't clutter up the office.

    I don't ever expect a vast amount of courtesy from those whose first rule of thumb is: if you want the picture back, then make sure *you* include the postage. Can you blame the office? If they paid postage on returning every single failed application they received every day, it'd probably cost them several hundred a year.

    But this percolates down: because actors aren't at a premium, there is far less need to treat them with special courtesy. Forbes is right when he says you just have to accept that, and plough on, regardless, making yourself stand out in such a way that agencies and casting offices learn to treat you as one of the actors who they *do* make time for.

    Still and all, not even bothering with a compliments slip is pretty poor, in my book!

    • 19th Nov 2011
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  • Rob Marni

    Actor

    There are a lot of time wasters, people with no credits never been to dramaschool submitting to CD's and Agents, so I am not suprised that they don't read all of them.

    And in reply to Bobby Diggs, Just because Forbes has been fortunate enough to fit a demograph to get some good credits doesnt make him the bible on all things in the Industry, I can take advice and learn from anyone no matter how experienced they are. You'll realise how much good fortune plays a part in the Film Industry and also the difference in difficulty for leading actors v character actors in getting Film work.

    Rob :)

    • 20th Nov 2011
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  • Michael Eden

    Actor

    Hi,

    Of course there is great deal of 'worldlyness' in many of these replies, and a degree of tough love. Consider though that it doesn't change you. I suspect that if you were in their shoes you would treat others like that and that marks you as someone who is respectful and sensitive to others. Good qualities in an actor I would say and even better for remaining a human being. Be like this yourself and don't expect others to be- so avoid disappointment and keep within the world by your own standards and individuality.

    Michael Eden

    • 20th Nov 2011
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  • Farah Sardar

    Actor

    And when you do get a reply from one of the 'Big people' you feel much more excited.

    I got a reply once from the Executive Producer of a well-known TV drama who I emaied my CV to. He apologised for replying late as he had been in hospital. I was shocked. 'Why would he reply to unknown actress like me?' I'm thinking. But true, dosn't happen v often.

    • 20th Nov 2011
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  • Forbes KB

    Actor

    Hey Rob! Thanks for taking the time to pop Bobby's bubble! Much appreciated!

    I think what he was trying to say is there will always be a multitude of opinions from all angles on all subjects on here! That's what makes us all unique. As for me being lucky enough to fit a certain demographic I think you'll find the 7 years of hard graft I spent scraping along the bottom had a bit to do with it. Last week I wrapped on Game of Thrones today I've just another done a student film! Determination and just a little humility goes a long way too!

    • 20th Nov 2011
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  • Rob Marni

    Actor

    Forbes, you know I appreciate you and your credits, I've said that to you before, so I wasn't attacking you or demeaning your hard efforts - yes I know about Game of Thrones, I have a friend (who you know)that got on this last series too so I saw you in the bloggs - good for you and her!

    I responded because it seemed like he was dismissing other valid comments -

    :)

    • 20th Nov 2011
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  • Forbes KB

    Actor

    It's all good Chief! I fully appreciate there's a fair amount of luck in our game but luck could account for maybe one or two credits...sustaining that and making a proper career in this game takes way more than luck! That's my point! Some do their grafting on the fringe theatre circuit like Laura has, some in the short films and indie circuit like I have! Both career paths are equally tortuous at times and both bring valuable experience to the table! My comments on theatre issues are generic and come from the drama school of life! Everyone who reads my ramblings makes up there own minds on the validity or irrelevance of those comments. They are but one mans opionion after all!

    Onwards and upwards!

    • 20th Nov 2011
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