Physical Theatre/Mask monologue

  • Mary Gerardine Hooton

    Actor

    Hey,

    I've got an audition coming up for a physical theatre company, and at the audtion, after the workshop, we have a chance to do a short monologue or dance or sing or etc....

    I already have a possible physcial theatre/mask speech in mind, but wondered if anybody had any other suggestions? I've already looked back through the other threads and seen a few ideas, but wonder if there was anything out there other than Godber!

    • 2nd May 2007
    • 4037
    • 5
  • Amanda Golding

    Actor

    Stephen Berkoff plays. The style is highly physical, and challenging. If you can get hold of a video of some of his plays being performed it would help. There's a lot of physical transformation, and the language is visceral, and physical in itself.

    But I wouldn't do it if you haven't at least a week to prepare.

    Otherwise - check out some absurdist writing. Ionesco, Beckett.

    Genet could be good too.

    If physical theatre's a big interest for you, it would be worth checking these authors out, in any case.

    Yes - theres' an awful lot more out there than Godber!

    Hope this helps. Good luck!

    Also

    • 1st May 2007
    • 1
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Dario fo?

    Make something up yourself?

    • 1st May 2007
    • 2
  • Mary Gerardine Hooton

    Actor

    Thanks for your help, I'll have a look.

    • 1st May 2007
    • 3
  • Cathy Conneff

    Actor

    The daughter from Six Characters in Search of an Author has a couple of brilliant monolgues, and she is a masked character.

    The Gril from The Unconquered by Torben Betts has some great monolgues too.

    • 1st May 2007
    • 4
  • Amanda Golding

    Actor

    It just occurred to me that, of course, pretty much any of Greek drama would have been masked, even Antigone.'Antigone' would be the right sort of age for you.Or you could choose something from ;'The Trojan Women' for example.

    Going back to the Berkoff, the point about that is that the characters sustain their 'masks' without actually sticking things physically on their faces. A great deal of expression is heightened, as is the language.

    • 2nd May 2007
    • 5