Plays

  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    Thought I would throw a little question your way on a thursday morning =)

    What in your opinion is the play that every actor should know and own?

    • 19th Aug 2007
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  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    Such a subjective question...

    how long is a piece of string??? Everyone has thoer own favourite play!!!

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 1
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    I know thatis why I asked =)

    thought it would be interesting to see how it varies.. I always find it interesting when actors get talking or if you are at an audition or to be honest anywhere with people in the industry and actors names and plays get mentioned and everyone nods sagely, even if you haven't got a clue

    What piece would be see as a must to have / know

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 2
  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    Les Liasons Dangereuses by Chritopher Hampton.. my all time favourite as well as

    A Streetcar named Desire. Tennessee Williams

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 3
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    I know .. that is why I asked =)

    • 16th Aug 2007
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  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    I would say anything by me.

    ;)

    Seriously, I think the complete works of shakespeare is a must for rejuvinating your love of theatre. Also playhouse creatures by April de Angelis is complulsory for actresses.

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 5
  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    Ah, but then again many actors dont like Shakespeare... some prfer the later works such as Jacobean or Restoration...

    Personally.. i like some shakespeare but jacobean and 19th century- Shaw, Wilde, Coward etc is more my bag...

    I can see a six page long thread developing from all of us passionate and strong mionded people!!!

    :))

    Sally, I would love to read your plays...where can we read them???

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 6
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    I think you can read samples of them at ScriptCircle...

    I'm currently working on a play made up of monologues and dulogues (I figure there's a amrket for actors there!)...

    More news as it emerges...

    • 16th Aug 2007
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  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    ooh!! oooh!!

    ( jumps up and down with girly giggles... and erases all masculine dignity in the process... )

    • 16th Aug 2007
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  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Don't get excited, my spelling of duologues doesn't bode well...

    www.scriptcircle.co.uk

    Quite good for finding unpublished, unusual stuff...

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 9
  • Toni Brooks

    Actor

    Enjoy by Alan Bennett. Too old to play the daughter now (although I do do her for auditions as it's okay out of context) but the mum is equally brilliant.

    Playhouse Creatures by April de Angelis.

    Art of Success by Nick Dear

    Anything by good old Will.

    Oscar Wilde stuff

    And I LOVE Under Milkwood by Dylan Thomas.

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 10
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Yeah i completely agree that the complete works is a must. Someone suggested to me recently that they weren't relevant to a contemporary actor and they couldn't be more wrong. Shakespeare is always relevant and is a constant test of your abilities as an actor. So buy the complete works, have a read and realise he's amazing. 'Cry "Havoc!" and unleash the dogs of war...'

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 11
  • Lee Ravitz

    Actor

    Well, my tastes are idiosyncratic, and I wouldn't particularly recommend them to all and sundry. For what it's worth, the playwright whose feet I tend to worship at is the German Romantic Georg Buchner, who is best known over here for 'Woyzeck', but who wrote two other plays, 'Danton's Death' (a pseuso Shakespearian account of one of the great men of the French Revolution) and 'Leonce and Leyna' (a light comedy about a pair of ill - matched lovers which is just, frankly, odder than that description makes it sound). I love all these plays, mainly because Buchner was capable of expressing in minimal amounts of words the most striking poetic imagery. Ironically, he wasn't even a full - time playwright (he was a biologist who wrote plays on the side) and he died at the age of 23.

    I also love a fair bit of that most absurdist of the absurdists, Eugene Ionesco, who wrote a whole series of plays that are sort of funny and sort of disturbing, which is what I tend to approve of in a play (though I do think he had a bit of a tendency to hammer the same points home over and over again).

    What is more interesting is the idea that some of the classics are being revisited in this thread. I think everyone tends to assume that just because something is placed on a pedestal, it must have an overinflated reputation - not at all, the reason something becomes 'classic' is because it was good in the first place.

    Shakespeare is the man, and provided you can get your head round the language, I think he wrote enough plays to provide something for everyone. The great works are held in the esteem they are for a reason, but all of Shakespeare combines a poetic brilliancy with a tremendously truthful set of insights into human nature and some cracking good storylines (there are even some decent jokes). Not every interesting play is very well known - the Henry VI Trilogy is a fascinating examination of power and corruption, for example, and Timon of Athens is, frankly, almost like a proto -piece of Samuel Beckett. So Shakespeare can always surprise you.

    Chekhov deserves the praise heaped upon his plots - Uncle Vanya, in particular, is stunning and devasting at the same time, as is Three Sisters. George Bernard Shaw is actually far, far funnier than I think anyone who hasn't read him would expect. And so on. There is, in other words, always something to be gained from reading the classics - or, indeed, any playwright who has a reputation. Their writing will warrant that reputation.

    Personally, for instance, I have no liking for Sarah Kane's work, which I tend to think was needlessly excessive for the sake of it. If it was being staged, I wouldn't rush to see it. But I don't argue with the quality of her *writing*, which I think is evocative and mesmerising, and any actor could learn from reciting.

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 12
  • Leila Reid

    Actor

    streetcar named desire, antigone, the diary of anne frank.

    does anyone know a good scene for three people?

    thanks leila x

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 13
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I love 'Oleanna' by David Mamet...actually, I love all of his stuff! He's got such an amazing way with words and language.

    • 16th Aug 2007
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  • Toni Brooks

    Actor

    Hi Leila

    Old Times by Pinter comes to mind - that's for two women and two men.

    Cheers

    A

    • 16th Aug 2007
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  • Toni Brooks

    Actor

    No no no - two women and ONE man - lawks a mussy - I've no idea where the brain's gone t'day :-))

    • 16th Aug 2007
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  • Claire Dodin

    Actor

    try Beyond Therapy by Christopher Durang

    It's brilliant!

    • 16th Aug 2007
    • 17
  • Mary Gerardine Hooton

    Actor

    I have a bias towards John Godber plays, Maybe its the Hull connection!

    • 16th Aug 2007
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  • Sharon Cannings

    Actor

    My top 3 at the moment-Uncle Vanya, Glass Menagerie, Krapps' Last Tape... mmm... lots of unhappy characters! But that's what makes them great!

    I suppose anything that avoids the terms "issue based" and "relevant". I like my art to have a poetry, or look at things in a different way. Not just "hold a mirror".

    I don't think I could write for Eastenders, then!

    • 16th Aug 2007
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