'The Sound of Music'

  • User Deleted

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    Hey guys, there's been so much discussion about this show and the pros and cons of finding a lead in this way, that I just wondered if anyone was going for it at the nationwide auditions?

    • 10th May 2006
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  • Hugh Osborne

    Actor

    Not looking good in a wimple, I don't think I'll bother. And of course the whole thing is a naked attempt to generate as much publicity as possible ("The tills are alive..."). Having said that, Lord L-W is so notoriously picky, that I can't see a complete novice getting through (even though she'll be playing a complete novice, if you see what I mean). As a general principle though, I find the whole thing nauseating. There's a joke about bad habits that I can't be bothered to make.

    H.xx

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 1
  • User Deleted

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    I guess the thing some people would be concerned with is that getting a role through a reality television programme might prevent them from being taken entirely seriously. You'd have to work doubly hard just to prove that you were talented and hard working enough rather than just someone that won what is essentially a game show.

    Does anyone know what the Musicality winners are up to at the moment, out of interest? If they're not having much success then the perils of reality tv have struck again! Creating fame for five minutes and then denying any lasting career-plan.

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Sheri Copeland

    Actor

    I am really in two minds about applying for this, have filled out the application form but just can't get the courage up to post it!

    Everyone I know is telling me to 'go for it' as I might get some exposure, but the thought of being riduculed on TV in front of millions is quite chilling.

    For continuity reasons everyone has to wear the same outfit for all stages of the auditions, which of course means they can cut and paste them all together to create a whole different 'reality' than what actually happens.

    I also agree that it could make it much harder to be taken seriously.

    Oh decisions, decisions!

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • John Garfield-Roberts

    Actor

    ok just a few questions - apart from it being done on tv - what is the actuall difference between this and any other open casting call for a musical that has several recall rounds?

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 4
  • User Deleted

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    I know what you mean Sheri about being in two minds, but the over-riding gut feeling I have is saying 'no' and that is what I have heard from quite a few others as well. I don't mind several rounds of auditions (if I got past the first one of course!) but there's something about doing it all on national tv and being judged by the people you know, work with etc. that you just don't get when you go for an audition in 'normal' circumstances.

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Martin Clark

    Actor

    Donna from Musicality (Mamma Morton - the older Scottish one)

    I think she went back to play it in the west end for a spell - and she does quite a lot of concerts etc in Scotland.

    Not sure about the others - I heard one of the girls was touring but not sure.

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Hugh Osborne

    Actor

    I suppose the difference between this and other shows with open castings is that this one is likely to foster the myth that anyone can be famous (and the secondary myth that working in theatre is somehow the SAME as being [in]famous).

    After all, the answer to the question "How do you solve a problem like Maria?" is a simple one: "Hire a competent casting director."

    When you look at all the good work that Clive H. does in his relentless campaign to stop bogus agencies taking up-front fees, then you have to realise that a programme like this sets back the cause greatly, because it continues to foster the notion of 'instant celebrity', upon which the bogus agencies thrive...

    As to being ridiculed on TV, Sheri, I've been looking at your list of credits; I'm pretty sure any ridicule being served up will be reserved for other (MUCH) less talented people. (I mean, if you're good enough for Bill Kenwright and David Kernan...). The one danger that you and others like you would more likely run, is of being fraudulently portrayed as "overnight successes", when actually you've been slogging away making a name for yourself for years...

    And the fact that you have to wear the same clothes to every stage of the audition so that you are forced unwittingly to connive with the programme makers' determination to impose a narrative on the whole process is deeply worrying.

    I suppose the question to ask oneself, in this and every instance, is: "On whose terms do I want to make a successful career, my own or somebody else's?" And when the somebody else's first duty is to the narrative shape of the programme rather than to the integrity of the participants, I'd be inclined to leave well enough alone.

    H.xxx

    PS When are the Captain Von Trapp auditions?

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Sheri Copeland

    Actor

    Hi,

    It is very interesting to hear other people thoughts on this.

    Hugh, thank you for your kind comments regarding my CV. However, I don't get seen by many casting directors for the big musicals, so this opportunity may be of a bonus to me.

    If they were to be casting the role of Maria through a casting director, it's highly unlikely that I would be seen for it.

    I agree with all that you have said but I also wonder if we do actually have THAT much control over our career. My reality is that I mostly get the jobs I get seen for but don't get that many castings.

    People are constantly spouting 'you make your own luck', my view on this is that most people that say that have had opportunities come their way and it's a very good way of justifying it and saying 'look at me, how hard I've worked and it's paid off' not a case of 'I've been lucky/fortunate to be the right face at the right time'. I have had some wonderful oppotunites and grasped them with both hands - but they don't always lead to another...

    Many, many people in our business work hard for years and don't get a huge pay off for it, and some never write a letter in their life to a casting director or agent and the work falls into their laps with ony a few weeks in-between jobs to say how hard it is to be 'resting'(I have some friends like this, drives me mad!)

    We all know that there are hundreds of people that could do the same job, it's just if you are the one being seen for it or you that certain 'something' they want.

    I appreciate this has gone slightly off-topic but do feel that it is relevant to the fact that they are wanting to cast an 'unknown'. I am an 'unknown', but have been working professionally for over 10 years.

    I had review at Christmas 2004 that called me a 'blonde newcomer', not bad for a 30 year old with 10 years work behind her!!!!!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 8
  • Augustine Flint-Hartle

    Actor

    I'd be very scared ~ everyone on that panel, or anyone who has screen time has an agenda. It is one thing to be "judged" and auditioned in private. But to do an audition where the footage will be edited for a tv programme (its ultimate aim being to persuade viewers to watch it)and making the process look more exciting and cut throat... one comment from the "panel" to makes themselves look knowledgable to the public could really damage you. A throw away comment to them could hurt your career and self-esteem.I'm not saying that people are malicious and will do it on purpose but the fact is it's in public and what should be a private, confidential process like any "job application" is being aired to those at home. Those at home will take that persons' view to be "expert".

    Saying that, this could be your opportunity to shine. Is it something that you will kick yourself for if you don't go for it? You've been in the business for a while so you're strong. You can always walk away if you smell a rat or something that isn't right.

    Break a leg!

    Ps about your audition clothes ~ it's better to wear something you're comfy and safe in than something that splits or falls down :) (Auds blushes at what could have been an embaressing memory with a new top).

    x

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Daisy Brydon

    Actor

    Sheri i completely agree with you. it is exactly like that. my godfather is a working actor and is NEVER out of work, but when he is for ooooohh 2 weeks or something, he complains!!

    i can't say that my CV looks great at the moment, because it doesn't, but this sort of opportunity for 'sound of music', and with Andrew L.W........well....its an opportunity, and experience, I always put these things down to experience.

    yes, ok, i am only just starting out professionally, so i am naieve about these things, so help me out here. i did send off the application form, and i had intended to go, but i am now in two minds reading all your comments!

    don't get me wrong, i hate these damn reality thingies, and there are becoming more and more of them, but is Andrew L.W likely to cast an amature?? my father made some furniture for him once, and he said he was quite a difficult man.....he's not supid (A.L.W), and we have to remember how fantastic his work is - phantom - 15years!! that says something doesn't it? and to be honest, has any casting directors really got time to watch things like this?? the only people i can imagine watching it are friends, and if they are going to mock me.....are they really my friends?

    Daisy x

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Augustine Flint-Hartle

    Actor

    hmmm I would watch it if I was a Casting Director just to see whats out there and who are applying. There are relatively few musical Casting Directors so it maybe something they would watch... they maybe able to see potential actresses/actors for their own castings and they don't even have to leave their front room ;)

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 11
  • User Deleted

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    The casting breakdown for all the other roles and ensemble went out on Spotlight a week ago - if your agent hasn't already subbed you, why not write to the production company and see if you can get a closed audition for one of the other roles there are plenty of them going?

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • User Deleted

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    ask yourself the question "to get the best viewing figures, what do the producers want to happen?" a. to get a trained professional actor to prove that they're right for the part (so why would they make the show if it just validates traditional casting?) or b. discover a sweet-natured plucky amateur from the counter at MacDonalds and turn her into a star? no-brainer, really.

    all the best, whichever way you decide to go.

    cliff

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Sheri Copeland

    Actor

    could always say I work at McDonalds...........or Tesco, maybe Lidl's!

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • User Deleted

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    Can you view casting breakdowns on 'Spotlight' as an actor? Sorry if that's a stupid question but if someone could tell me where the other casting breakdowns are for 'SOM' I'd be very grateful...thanks!

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    I am totally agianst what Lloyd Webber is doing as I am agianst teh Musicality stunt. The resons is that many performers spend YEARS not only training but auditioning for a show like CHICAGO or Sound of Music.

    The perforemrs do really well on the show after an unreal amount of coaching to do thier one night...and in real rehearsals, its NOT like this., A good friend of mine was in CHICAGO, she had two weeks as a dancer to learn the show. She is good as she had done FOSSE before, ands adfmitted that for her CHICAGO was a walk in the park.

    But the issue is that actors are disrespected by the attitudes that "amaturs can do it just as well...". The truth? The girl who played Roxie in that MUSICALITY event was a TRAINED musical theatre actress...she was the best.And did SaturdayNight Fever afterwards., The teacher who played Billy Flynn...not in the industry. Even my friedn said they were not ready for it.The Scottish Woman, Donna Hazelton chose not to train as she has a family...fair enough.

    I ahve an issue with this becasue there are many legit performers who SHOULD be given the break...not people who havent trained been given a crash course in CHICAGO. None of them wanted to train after the show , as agents said they should. Only the male dancer hAS OPTED FOR TRAINING. He is going about it the right way.

    Most people who go up for this will be statistics of publicity and will sadly probabaly find out the whole thing was already cast anyway.

    The problem is that an unfair illusion is cast on this profession by these shows. I was cast in a lead when I started out...had great critical acclaim..only tyo be unemployed for a long time afterwards. The public disregards the hard work involved by us actors and devalues our training. And all of us..whether we have been to drama school or not..are usually BLOODY hard workers. People on this forum do NOT strike me as lazy at all.

    My opinion is that the profession should cater for the profession...NOT for untrained people who dont understand the hard work involved. If you havent trained, but are committed to the profession...this is totally different. But you would have no illusions and would consider yourself professional.You would then seek to grow as a performer. This isnt towards that kind of person.

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Martin Clark

    Actor

    I agree with johns comment earlier - why do musicals hold OPENS - anyone can go along to them and do - and are cast!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 17
  • User Deleted

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    Reading Blake's comment, although I still think that being taken seriously as a musical theatre performer after going the reality television route might be a problem for some people, his point about the Musicality winners choosing not to go on and train further really struck me. It's not so much not getting taken seriously, but whether people would see you as someone unwilling to learn further, which as we all know, we all need to keep doing.

    Either way, as with all reality tv, it's doing it's job - the contestants haven't even been chosen yet and everyone's already talking about it!

    • 1st Jun 2006
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  • Louise Mathews

    Actor

    Guys, I'm so glad this discussion was started fair play to the lady who struck up the conversation! I was going to go! I sent my application and everything. Thn I watched The sound of music again (and I mean its been a life long dream to play Maria! But who hasn't had that dream right?!) I found to my utter amazement that I have been deluding myself!

    I am an ALTO! I can't sing those high notes! So why on earht do I think I would ever get cast! (even if I have stopped smoking and broadened my range!) I'm never gonna be a soprano and no part of the audition notes does it say - need to be a soprano! I seriously doubt their gonna change the entire key to suit me...so wouldn't I be making a royal foll of myself! Event hough I am a singer! Imagine how bad I would sound if they forced me on national TV to try for the top notes!!!

    I'm starting to think it would be the end of me! Then the other little voice in my head says...

    What if they see you as great fro another part in something else...like someone else said...casting directors may be watching for other things!

    I don't know what to do...I convince myself one way then the other every five minutes! Welcome to my indecisive world!!!! lol

    What do ye's think a no go or a why not!!!???

    • 1st Jun 2006
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