Animations and computer games

  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Any hints or tips on getting into animation and computer game voice work?

    • 3rd Mar 2006
    • 1560
    • 24
  • Caroline Boulton

    Actor

    Edge magazine is were the indie game makers advertise for programmers etc, you could try contacting some companies directly. Its really a voice over job so the normal voice over advice is applicable but you could try that as an alternative. I used to date computer game designer which is always another option....x

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 1
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Hahahah! OK, maybe not dating, but thanks.

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 2
  • Mark Joseph

    Actor

    I just sent a submission to every game company in the country, and got a v/o from that.

    Mark.

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 3
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Yikes- did you find them through voice over contacts?

    I've been in touch with Babelmedia, but not getting very far!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 4
  • Mark Joseph

    Actor

    Nope, just surf the net and there are lists of game companies in the UK. Send a few e-mails and see if they need anyone.

    Mark.

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 5
  • Pierre Maubouché

    Actor

    Hiya Sally, it's quite hard to break into games - I must say each time I did a game it has been through a voiceover agent, although with the development of casting portals that might change soon. So my advice is, get a VO agent ASAP - with your drive it shouldn't be impossible!

    On a separate note, not many people mention ADR and yet, I know a bunch of actors who litteraly make a living with it. It is a rather close circle but then again if we looked at everything this way we'd do nothing, right? At £220/half day, it's not too shabby and it's still working on movies... worth looking into.

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 6
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Well, I'd definitely be interested in it- but don't know a thing about it- do tell!

    Sally

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 7
  • Pierre Maubouché

    Actor

    Sorry for late reply - as it happens, I was working on the Da Vinci Code movie last week, and no I can't say more about the movie or they get their lawyers to hang me by the jewels!

    I don't know how much you know about ADR so I'll cover all.

    ADR stands for Automatic Dialog Replacement. Don't ask me why, as there's nothing automatic, and most of the time it's not replacement, it's adding sound. I explain.

    Usually, when a scene is shot only the main charaters are recorded, the crowd is not, so the ambience obviously needs to be added in post-production for the movie to sound real. This is when ADR artists come into play. You are booked per half day, and do whatever you're asked to do, which revolves around impro with a theme, which is given to you by the ADR director. The studios where ADR is usually recorded at Pinewood and Sheperton, and in Soho: De Lane Lea, Goldcrest, Mayflower and Boom - there you go, hope that helps!

    There you go, hope that helps!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 8
  • Thomas Matthews

    Actor

    For those of us currently looking for VO representation would you suggest we approach the recording studios themselves or are you getting your work through your agent. Currently saving up for voicefinder.biz as am very keen to gain more experience in this area.

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 9
  • Pierre Maubouché

    Actor

    Recoding studios won't be able to help you re. VO representation. I get my work through various sources including direct clients, voiceover portals, internet, and a lot of it comes from my agent. As for ADR work, studios won't be able to help you either, you've got to get 'in the gangs', hard but eh! the ones who are now there were on the other side one day, so it's not impossible - good luck!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 10
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    I think he means "if you haven't yet got an agent, is it worth approaching sources of work, rather than waiting for any future agent to do so"...

    I'm certainly approaching lots of places- still not sure I want a vo agent. Plus it slightly steps on my acting agent's toes as they put my forward for voice work...

    Thanks for all your advice, you've been so generous! And well done about Da Vinci- but I know nothing about that. Nudge nudge.

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 11
  • Pierre Maubouché

    Actor

    Don't even know what you're talking about ;-)

    Thing is, recording studios aren't the source of work - having said that they do recommend artists from time to time, so it can't hurt to approach them, but they're more likely to recommend someone they've already worked with, or someone who already has a cred in the industry. I know, it's the famous egg/chicken conendrum (sp?)... Sources of work will always tend to trust people from within the industry, may it be agents, professional bodies such as voiceover portals, other VO artists, basically people who have vetted unknown artists before them, so they feel secure. Being an acting agent and being a VO agent is two completely different jobs and your acting agent shouldn't have any problem with you having VO representation somewhere else - I know many people who are in this situation and this is more or less the norm. Having an agent will open new doors to you but, eh, your call - good luck whatever you decide!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 12
  • Thomas Matthews

    Actor

    Thanks for your advice there. Have recently been pursuing various avenues and any extra info helps.

    Cheers

    Thom

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 13
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Yet another boring technical question:

    slimline case for a cd or standard jewel case?

    The former is cheaper (less inserts), but I'm concerned that the latter is the better option as it's standard, has a spine label and fits in an ordinary cd rack.

    Told you it was boring!

    Sally

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 14
  • Pierre Maubouché

    Actor

    LOL Sally - you've got it right: definitely a standard one so if the agent/client wants to store your CD in the case then they can spot your CD on the spine (provided your label is printed on the spine as well that is!)

    Having said that, I must say demo CDs are a dying breed - I haven't sent one for years now! Instead I email my mp3 demo.

    Having Said That Part Two The Return, I'm going to contradict what I've just said by saying that you absolutelt need a CD if you want to get your demo to agents - hope this helps!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 15
  • Thomas Matthews

    Actor

    Hey Pierre,

    thanks so much for all your advice. Have applied for several voice-over jobs recently and two have contacted asking me to record samples of their scripts and send in mp3 mode. I take it with new technology this i s much easier to do than before and probably will become the norm. However i do not have any recording equiptment and will probably lose out on the chance to do these particular jobs. Can i ask, do you know of a basic recording programme which willl run on normal laptop, obviously with a mic. If so, are they expensive? Complicated? Is this something you experience a lot of or because of the amount of experience you have is this no longer relevant to you.

    Appreciate all you help.

    Thom

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 16
  • Sally Beaumont

    Actor

    Yes, sticky issue.

    I have several studios I can work with just around the corner, so to all intents and purposes I have my own studio. However I get a few requests from voice123 for samples, and am consequently hooking up a mic to my computer (struggling with wires as we speak). The quality is not ideal, so you have to make it clear that this is a sample and the real thing will be beautiful quality.

    The next stage for me is to buy a better soundcard, then an m-box (I have a sound dead spare room which is ideal)...

    Hope that helps...

    Sal

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 17
  • Thomas Matthews

    Actor

    Hi Sal,

    thanks for reply. But forgive my lack of computer knowledge. Do you need or use a specific programme to record on your computer, surely I can't just connect a mic and make an mp3 without. I agree the sound quality may not be great but as an indication of how well you read, and also as a rehearsal/practise tool, i think its definately something i'd be interested in investing in.

    Thanks

    Thom

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 18
  • Pierre Maubouché

    Actor

    Sally is right: if this is for a delivery test then any crap mic and recording freeware will do (within reason), if you have a mac then use IMovies and your integrated mic - if this is for sound quality test then... it won't do, obviously.

    While some people gear up with the cheapest stuff they can find, I'd recommend an Mbox (the new one is judiciously called Mbox2), it's bundled with LE ProTools, and a good professional mic. Neumann U87 is the industry standard but rather pricey so if your wallet can't stretch that far then TLM103 (also Neumann) is a very good value for money mic.

    Last but not least, you need a dead room, so

    1/ the lorry passing in the street doesn't become an M&E on your take, and

    2/ the sound isn't roomy

    Hope that helps!

    • 1st Jun 2006
    • 19