Call time when filming

  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Why is it that the time actors are called for filming is never the time they are needed?Surely Directors must have some idea when they will be shooting a scene!I've waited more than 8 hours & I'm not talking Block buster film!Mainly it seems to be the'techies'holding things up.M.Coghlan

    • 2nd Mar 2009
    • 3657
    • 42
  • Forbes KB

    Actor

    Moan moan moan! It's these sorts of posts that get us actors a bad name!

    Having everyone who is required on set gives the director flexibility! In the pro world the day is very tightly scheduled! If conditions, for whatever reason, mean they need to reorganise their plans isn't it smart to have all the actors in place!

    You're booked for the day! Waiting around is par for the course! Just be thankful you're getting work and stop moaning for goodness sake!

    Rant over!

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 1
  • Monty Burgess

    Actor

    Forbes is right, filming plans can change at the drop of a hat. I'd rather be waiting around on a film set any day of my life than waiting around at home.

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 2
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Me too, Monty.

    In fact, I love that part of the job.

    Sitting around chatting. lol

    Sarah

    xx

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 3
  • Mark Kempner

    Actor

    awww..poor Michael...he only asked a simple question....dont jump down his throat!!

    Michael...they are quite right! I think its just something you have to accept. I always take my laptop, or something to read and write with...paper/book etc. If you are being paid....you could also think in terms of having waited around for so long...there could well be a chance of some nice overtime too! My agent always asks for exact start and end times to the filming day I have done.

    As long as you have been given a reasonable waiting room/space etc....relax and use the time usefully or as Sarah rightly says...socially too.

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 4
  • Rob Talbot

    Actor

    I'm with Forbes - and sorry it sounds brutal.

    The day can be long enough on a film set without having to listen to someone moan moan moan about not getting used. If you don't like it, choose another job. It won't change for you ... unless, maybe, you are fortunate enough to become A-list :o)

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 5
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Was it Anthony Hopkins who said something to the effect of 'It's the waiting around I get paid for; the acting I do for free'?

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 6
  • Simon Burbage

    Actor

    Thats an aewsome quote!

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 7
  • Mark Joseph

    Actor

    Given that rehearsal time on film is short, if not non-existent, use all the time you can to prepare. Check the set out to work out your actions/business. Make sure you know that space as well as you can, so when it's mark hitting time, you can't fail.

    I'm guilty of using free time to socialise, usually with hair/make-up, but really any free time should be used productively.

    M.

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 8
  • Forbes KB

    Actor

    Aww Poor Michael!! Not!! He showed a severe lack of understanding of the process and is clearly not a team player by blaming it on the techies!!

    I've never seen any "techies" hanging around drinking tea and chatting unless on a scheduled break...they are usually balls out from call time to wrap time and then have to pack all the stuff away and relocate to the next location long after we, the on-screen talent, are tucked up in bed!!

    There's no "I" in team and filmaking is very much a team sport!! Get with the program or find another game to play!!

    GGrrrr!!!

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 9
  • Mark Kempner

    Actor

    ...isn't there 2 x M's in FILMMAKING!

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 10
  • Nicola Kelleher

    Actor

    i know this is frustrating but I think they call you in early (if your doing it for low paid or fee) so that they can check you are actually coming. If they call you at 5pm and they have filmed all day and you dont turn up... everything gets a bit crazy... thats what I was told when I asked a director once, as they knew when I arrived I would not be needed until the end of the shoot

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 11
  • Antonio Rochira

    Actor

    Lol…this thread really is hilarious. Michael, sorry mate but you are getting your ass kicked.

    Whilst I agree that waiting is part of the process, and I am more than happy to do it (because I'd rather be on set than pretty much anyway else) it can get tedious sometimes. I think it also depends whether you are playing a lead role or a supporting role.

    As Forbes said the crew on EVERY film I've ever done is always outstanding and extremely hard working and they put in the longest hours. This applies to any big-budget feature film to any low-budget short.

    I'm sure however that on several occasions I've probably moaned a little myself being called only one hour after the crew, when everyone knows it takes at least 2-3 hours to set up lights! Having said that…bring a book, or get to know the cast/crew, and as Mark (Joseph) says know your set.

    Be happy that you are doing what you want to do, and if you aren't happy…maybe it's not what you want to do?!!!

    The Anthony Hopkins quote, whilst great, is a personal thing. I would agree that I am being paid for the tedious parts of the day because I love to be there and act. However I'm sure that a Producer would argue that he is being paid for the acting part he does on set and hence the box-office draw.

    Now then, on a lighter subject, a couple of other items.

    Forbes…there is no 'I' in team, however one could argue that there is a 'me' in team! :)

    Splat…sorry mate, but as usual I'm not sure what you're talking about. :(

    Mark (Kempner)…is it filmmaking or film-making or film making? Either way come on we all really should know better by now than have a go at Splat's grammatical skills! I'm just yanking your chain Splat…all in jest.

    And now that some feathers have probably been ruffled…

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 12
  • Mark Kempner

    Actor

    I was chain yanking too!! Honest Splat....please don't shout at me!!

    ....I can't spell for tofeee ...tofffe... tof....doh...you know what I mean!

    PSST...I still think it has 2 x MM's!! yank yank!!

    • 26th Feb 2009
    • 13
  • Lee Ravitz

    Actor

    I think on the film set things frequently get tedious for the actor, but that is the nature of the medium you are working in - too many actors who are used to stage productions or even television make this mistake when they are working to create movies. In theatre, the actor is very much a paramount focus of the whole process, and everything revolves around the actor - honing their performance, boosting their ego etc. etc. Weeks are taken to give the actor the feel that they are developing a through line of action, exercises encouraged to get their brains working through every nuance of the character. If the tech team do make an appearance within the confines of a stage show's rehearsals (i.e. before the tech proper), they stay in the background making notes, and discuss issues with the director. It is also assumed that they will 'get it right on the night', and enhance the actors performance. In television, obviously the setup is much more screen oriented, but there tends to be a swiftness of turnover which is necessary for budgetary reasons, and an actor frequently has to be 'on their mettle' in short, sharp bursts.

    However, on the cinema set, none of these 'rules' apply. The actor is, in fact, a pretty minor part of the wider cinematic machine. Certainly, it's felt by the director that, even if they value the actor's contribution, everything else about the scene is more important to the aesthetic look of their work - checking the sound levels, the light levels, the way the light is being filtered, the angles the shots will be taken at, the relative positioning of bodies and objects within the space, etc. etc. Every person on the set has a vital job to do, and all are hugley important to the film's successful working and I think Forbes is right - you will never find 'techies' (actually, the crew) 'slacking off' on set, because they have the toughest jobs and longest hours of all to fulfil. What they may do is have very long, sometimes heated, debates as to how to shoot a scene, rig a setup so that it remains out of shot etc. and these can take far longer than is desirable (for both the actors and the director!), but, in the end, it is these decisions that make the film look better, and so are a necessary part of the working process.

    In a disciplined and professional set-up, you should always be given the full day's call sheet (not just a call time) and therefore be made aware of what is shooting that day, how long it is scheduled to take, etc. It is true that schedules can be moved around, and that the alloted times overrun (a hazard of the job) - but, actually, it's in the interests of the director and crew to try and bring things in on time as well, and they never overrun if they can avoid it. Equally, the point of the Hokins quote is, of course, so long as you are being paid, don't question the set-up - many people would love to have a job which consists of being given a decent wage for sitting around all day, and then doing five minutes work! (Of course, as Mark suggested, this doesn't mean there is nothing constructive you can be doing as you wait around).

    In none paying or student setups, these types of wait can be less forgivable - then, they are often down to an inefficent director and crew failing to know how to manage a shoot day properly, and you are probably right to bawl out a student director, say, for calling you in at 9 in the morning without sending you a callsheet, not using you until 9 in the evening, and failing to pay you a wage for having given up the best part of your day. But this sort of case is different: it is perfectly within your rights in this kind of situation to either force them to speed up the filming, or walk off the set, and certainly to lodge complaints. With a disciplined production company, however, the issue is one of learning to compromise.

    • 27th Feb 2009
    • 14
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I was merely making a point for discussion & not ranting as one angry actor suggests.I'm always thanked for my patience.I've been in the business 20 years but think that forward planning would help.Recently I was booked & paid for 4 hours but did 8 with no extra pay!

    • 27th Feb 2009
    • 15
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I was merely making a point for discussion & not ranting as one angry actor suggests.I'm always thanked for my patience.I've been in the business 20 years but think that forward planning would help.Recently I was booked & paid for 4 hours but did 8 with no extra pay!

    • 27th Feb 2009
    • 16
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I was merely making a point for discussion & not ranting as one angry actor suggests.I'm always thanked for my patience.I've been in the business 20 years but think that forward planning would help.Recently I was booked & paid for 4 hours but did 8 with no extra pay!

    • 27th Feb 2009
    • 17
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I was merely making a point for discussion & not ranting as one angry actor suggests.I'm always thanked for my patience.I've been in the business 20 years but think that forward planning would help.Recently I was booked & paid for 4 hours but did 8 with no extra pay!

    • 27th Feb 2009
    • 18
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I was merely making a point for discussion & not ranting as one angry actor suggests.I'm always thanked for my patience.I've been in the business 20 years but think that forward planning would help.Recently I was booked & paid for 4 hours but did 8 with no extra pay!

    • 27th Feb 2009
    • 19