Lifer

  • Beau Rambaut

    Actor

    Just notice that I have been in this industry for about 6 years.

    Does this make me a lifer?

    How long have you guy's been doing this?

    • 29th Mar 2008
    • 1140
    • 21
  • Alan Brent

    Actor

    Only 25 years. I started late as a pro!

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 1
  • Emma Sewell

    Actor

    Does your training count.......? I think it should if you were working along side it.

    If so then it sounds much longer than it feels... Coming up to 7 years! I know nothing, I should KNOW so much more by now..... (dramatic hand gesture to head)

    Give me 25 years like Alan and maybe I feel better informed.

    Em.xx

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 2
  • Jenny Randall

    Actor

    Well it seems im in my 4th year. Seems longer....maybe thats becasue of all the temp jobs inbetween......I do try to sing in the office...does that count???

    xx

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 3
  • Alan Brent

    Actor

    25 years in and I'm still learning, Nim!

    Every day something new comes up. Some new experience never met before. Some new person with other influences.

    The whole process never lets you stop learning. If you do and think you know everything that's when you find out you know nothing!

    The whole Industry is an ever changing enigma. One minute you're on your way, the next you're at a full stop. The only real lesson I have learned and still maintain is never changing is that whatever you believe to be right someone else thinks is totally wrong!!

    But then it's only a matter of being able to adapt to the ever changing needs.

    That may sound far more deeply profound than I meant it to be. I've just seen the full feature film where I played a very small part and am in awe of some of the performances. I'm feeling a bit 'humble' at the moment.

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 4
  • Emma Sewell

    Actor

    Wise words alan, wise words.

    And that's what we love about it hey? Congrats on the film by the way. Can you say what it is?

    Em.xx

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 5
  • Alan Brent

    Actor

    Just as an example of what I mean by 'ever changing', the film is a feature film one and a half hours long which was to have been funded by the Canadian Film Board (or whatever name they use now). When they pulled out after the first few days of filming because of the change of leadership on their board this film would have been never made were it not for some extraordinary crew and actors who were determined to finish the project knowing that unless it actually was shot that a great story would have gone untold!

    Now. I am one who ALWAYS insists that actors get paid for their work at the correct rate and on time and never end up out of pocket for their efforts.

    However, three weeks in to filming I got a call out of the blue asking me to do a short scene around the corner from where I lived on a Sunday morning (when I am normally in bed warm and snug with the Sunday papers). Intrigued, I went and shot the scenes for them and they gave me my expenses and a share in the film.

    I have received the 'rough cut copy' this morning and was totally enraptured by the script, storyline and quality of the filming given that they shot this with absolutely NO budget whatever.

    However they had no money to pay up front for the Post Production which will take the 'rough cut' to 'final release quality'. They need £10,000 to do it.

    I arranged for local newspapers to carry the story and a screening of the 'rough cut' so 100 individuals could put in £100 each for a one fifth of one share in the film, invitation to the Premiere, mention in the credits, and a scene in the DVD Extra scenes section of those who put up their money.

    This takes place on Saturday 29th March at ten am at the Bradford Media Museum.

    So far, pledged without seeing the product there are 45 people offering their money 'sight unseen'. After Saturday there will be enough to cover the costs.

    This is a totally unique system of funding a film without losing control of the final edits, reshoots or selling the film to anyone.

    Innovation only comes from those who think 'Major Problem, let's break it down to Minor Problem' and go for it 100%.

    Since this is a confidential screening I won't let anyone know the name of it until after Saturday.

    But as an example of having to sometimes 'Think outside of the box' I think it goes a long way.

    I hope that others who think 'It can't be done' will now start to think 'They say it can't be done but this is how I intend to do it!' and never look over their shoulders to see the detractors trying to drag them back to proves that they are right and you are wrong.

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 6
  • Emma Sewell

    Actor

    That's pretty cool! I love to see things like this happening and, as you've said, people finding solutions to problems in the industry. It also gives em hope for my own small efforts.

    Please let me know what it's called when you can I'm going to HAVE to see it, now you've said how good it is!

    Em.x

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 7
  • Toni Brooks

    Actor

    That's just brilliant. I hope you get loads of people coming along to support the film.

    Cheers

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 8
  • Kenny Richards-Preston

    Actor

    Bravo Alan, fantastic way to raise extra funds, without taking the charity approach or losing rights and royalites, an excellent idea.

    18yrs experience here, 15 as a pro, don't class myself as a lifer yet lol!

    As Alan said, we never stop learning!!

    :-)

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 9
  • Alan Brent

    Actor

    I guess I should be a Lifer. I've murdered a few 'characters' before now!!!

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 10
  • Kenny Richards-Preston

    Actor

    LMAO

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 11
  • Tammy Heath nee Wakefield

    Actor

    Go Alan GO

    Can Equity help even if it just publicity.... Now I am humble but then again people listen to you don't they you have this aura about you. I graduated about 10 years ago with a gap in the middle.

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 12
  • Lee Ravitz

    Actor

    Well, I only graduated two and a half years ago, which may surprise some of you! In point of fact, though, I have been doing stints in professional acting on-off since the age of 16, and, when you total that up, I've been acting for 12 years or so.

    For many years, I looked to earn my living at something else (which I suppose is the issue at hand), although I also earnt money from acting, and performed in some decent productions. In a real sense, there is little difference between my acting life then and now, other than the fact that now, I call myself an actor 24/7. But it was pointed out to me at one time that if I could say I got one or two decent professional gigs a year, whilst doing other things, then I was, in fact, doing as well at acting as some full time professionals. I had to concede that there was a point to that argument, and the sense in which I was non - professional was more a 'semantic' issue than anything else.

    Still, going to drama school made me feel like I had finally 'credentialed' my commitment to acting, if you like. But when I say I have over a decade's experience in theatre and film, I'm (also) not lying!

    So, it's complicated. I turned to acting 'full-time' when I realised I spent more time and energy committing to the plays/films etc. I was making than to my (supposed) full-time job. I'm sure the majority of us must have travelled that kind of path.

    On a completely unrelated note - but apropos of Alan's discussions - the microbudget feature which I am most vociferously backing at the moment (and in which I appear), 'Burlesque Fairytales', is finally reaching a stage of final edit, before it heads to Cannes. Although it will have to be given into the hands of the money men eventually, I have felt all along that this project has been phenomenal - the quality of what has been shot, of the people who have become involved in it, belies totally the fact that *everything* (and I mean that) has been the sheer result of the *goodwill* of all involved. A top flight crew were willing to work on the project in their down time; remarkable actors were happy to put their hand to it; major film stock suppliers were happy to loan equipment; studio spaces was offered in the down seasons for filming. True, the guys behind the film had a great grounding in the cinema industry before they started - which has done immense things to boost their contact base, and the favours they can call in, but I still think the film is a magnificent example of what can be done when enthusiasm for seeing a film through outweighs the actual monies available at its inception. Please see www.doublebarrelproductions.co.uk/bc-march-08.html for a little more information on the project, if you're interested.

    • 27th Mar 2008
    • 13
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    im on 12 years and feeling the strain! I do think what is the point but then i dont want to miss out. The big break might just be around the corner!

    Eastendrs

    • 28th Mar 2008
    • 14
  • Kevin Patrick Buxton

    Actor

    thanks for that up lifting and and i have to say inspiring bit, would you like to be my dad and let me pop round for chats like this when im a bit low. it is funny that with age, me included now in around 23rd year comes a more possitive out look lost i feel on some of the newcommers to this game, who i suspect expected everything to come flooding in just because they were now trained and had been told how fantastic they were by the drama school they were at, not sure, any thoughts anyone. just going to have some cake now, well it is friday afterall

    • 28th Mar 2008
    • 15
  • Emma Sewell

    Actor

    Not all of us feel like that Kevin, promise!!! I'm positive. 'Look I'm smiling' as Jason Robert Brown wrote!!!

    xxxx

    • 28th Mar 2008
    • 16
  • Alan Brent

    Actor

    And what a lovely smile it is, Nem!

    • 28th Mar 2008
    • 17
  • Emma Sewell

    Actor

    Ahhh thank you. Flattery will get you everywhere, especially in this game as we have been discussing!!

    E.x

    • 28th Mar 2008
    • 18
  • Simon Weir

    Actor

    22 years and still plugging away. Lost count of the number of films (Short and Feature Length) that I have worked on that have been shelved, run out of funding, abandoned etc. I'm now of the mindset that if the Producers do not have a budget and emergency fund to complete a film then they should never have started in the first place. Its such a disappointment when it happens to you, some of your best work..wasted.

    • 28th Mar 2008
    • 19