Meisner

  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    Hello all,

    I am taking my first course at the Actors Temple on Saturday, A one day introduction to Meisner with Tom Radcliffe.

    I am quite excited! Is anyone else going from here? long shot I know! but I think there are a couple of spaces left too.

    Good luck with anything you are working on at the moment

    :0)

    Rebecca x

    • 11th Aug 2006
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  • User Deleted

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    Hi Rebecca

    Yeah, I was booked to go on that, but had to cancel as I am doing a night shoot on Friday night and Saturday night. What with working during the day on Friday, I kind of figured I wouldn't be able to make it the 48 hours without any sleep! (Or drugs! ;-))

    Shame, am sure it would have been good. Never mind, next time!

    Cheers

    Sue

    • 1st Aug 2006
    • 1
  • Mensah Bediako

    Actor

    Hey y'all!

    I did Module 1 of the Meisner course at the Actors Temple a few weeks ago and have been trying to do weekly repetition follow-ups since then. In the middle of my first week there I had a real breakthrough; I hesitate to say a revelation because it sounds dramatic but that's what it felt like. As good as my previous drama school was for me in many ways I felt I made more progress in the week of the Module than in all my previous 2 years.

    Needless to say, I'd recommend training at the Temple 100% (and no I'm not in their employ in any way shape or form).

    All the best!

    • 1st Aug 2006
    • 2
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    ah that's a shame but good luck with the shoot..........

    its great that it worked so well for you! I hope I will get as much from it as you did!

    I shall let you know how it went.

    Enjoy the rest of your day

    x

    • 2nd Aug 2006
    • 3
  • Toni Brooks

    Actor

    Although Meisner isn't for me the Actors Temple is really brilliant and Mark and Ellie who run it are really lovely people. I've done other courses and one off training events there and can thoroughly recommend them.

    Cheers

    • 2nd Aug 2006
    • 4
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    This will be my first experience of Meisner so it will be a new experience all around!

    • 2nd Aug 2006
    • 5
  • Mensah Bediako

    Actor

    Hiya!

    My previous statement sounded quite harsh.

    What I meant to say was that the training I've had so far at the Actors Temple has presented with me a clear technique or a process that I can use to access emotion in a powerful way.

    Drama school taught me many OTHER important things about the (business of) acting. Discipline, hard work, dealing with rejection (re auditions), the sheer joy working with an ensemble of actors, how to work with a director and the reality of the politics (good and bad) of an actors relationship with the people he/she works with.

    • 3rd Aug 2006
    • 6
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    I also graduated from the Poor school, I thoroughly enjoyed my training but that finished 5 years ago (jesus was it that long...... *starts rocking in corner feeling old*) and I think this will be a good way to keep my skill levels up.

    • 3rd Aug 2006
    • 7
  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    I think you should go for it, but always just be aware that its not the ONLY tool that an actor can use to grow. It may be exactly what you need personally and will "sit" with you.

    I have personally come to believe that there are many "roads to Rome" in the topic of acting technique and what works for one may not work for another.

    I went through this phase wondering if I was missing out and while I have been busy and not had time to do Meisner etc, I did wonder if I was personally "lacking" in technique.

    I now think that its imporanat to be open to a wide variety of tools and techniques as there are so many around, and to trust that which sits with you. I know an actress who uses a verty unorthodox type of technique called "emotional access" and it really works for her in a great way. I have a different approach and while I can always improve, I had been open to her way of doing stuff but know its not the ultimate way for me.

    I do however question how much its got to do a technique so much as the openenss and willingness of the person to engage and the talent of that person. Also, seeing as we are all different, we all respond from different left or right brain hemispheres and have different modes we work in..some are touch, some auditory etc..its really impossible to say one way is the only way.

    • 3rd Aug 2006
    • 8
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    I agreee with you thisis not the only way. I am going to give many different types of courses a try ..... this way atleast I am active while I am resting.

    • 3rd Aug 2006
    • 9
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    I always wonder about how much we need to invest in techniques and suchlike. I don't know if any of you are like me, but I tend to be in my head far too much, and analyse and worry too much. So for me the biggest challenge is always to follow my gut instinct, to let the emotions come out in whatever form that may be, and to think about techniques less. Does that make sense?

    Since leaving drama school, I haven't reallt done any more training, apart from on the job, although I have attended some workshops which have been very experimental and freeflowing, which has really helped me. Am I alone in needing to maybe keep a certain distance from techniques, or am I simply a freak?

    Za x

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 10
  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    Dont get like that.Its so easy to become self concious.

    I think its good to always be aware that there are courses at the Actors Centre whch would help you with those very issues.

    It must be said that there is a place for also not doing classes. But its good to do them and to learn from others..iron sharpens iron etc. So i think its purely your choice, just dont go thinking you are weird etc.

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 11
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    FREAK!

    :) no not at all. this will be my first experience of a specific technique to my knowledge so it will be interesting to see if it is any use to me, I tend to be very natural in my processes and juts let the emotions flow freely.Maybe I will learn a different kind of discipline or maybe it will be good to be in that kind of learning environment for a bit.

    God just lovey when we actors get going!

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 12
  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    GROUP HUG ALL!!!!!

    :) Lets all think of bunnies and fowers and stuff.. brown paper packages tied up with string...these are avfew of my favour....

    wait..sorry....didnt get a call back for "How do yo solve a problem like Maria?". Still dealing with it.

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 13
  • Mensah Bediako

    Actor

    G'day folks!

    I was often told I was too 'in my head' at drama school. At other times I have been able to spontaneously not be. The whole thing was too hit and miss for me though and very frustrating. My recent training has given me a clear way to overcome that but obviously it depends on what kind of person you are. No 'technique' is an end in itself; in fact focusing on the method defeats the object. As way of getting out of my own way and avoiding self-consciousness Meisner has been very effective so far. At a recent audition I was so into the scene that I completely forgot that we were being filmed because my attention was solely on the other actor. No nerves, no second-guessing, no energy wasted.

    Anyway, got to dash so all the best and good luck with whatever you're doing right now.

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 14
  • User Deleted

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    Interesting stuff, although I'm not really worried I'm a freak! I guess everyone responds to different methods, and it is indeed always useful to be playing and experimenting with fellow actors. Maybe Meisner would be good for me to have a stab at - nothing to lose x

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 15
  • Lee Ravitz

    Actor

    I think whether or not you choose to do lots of extra classes is a very personal thing...because 'process' is a very personal thing, frankly. I think that they *can* be really worthwhile for all sorts of reasons - meeting other actors, allowing you to experiment with things, and, especially during a period when you haven't acted much for a while, and you may need to stop yourself getting 'rusty'. And you never know - certain things *are* revelatory.

    On the other hand, I believe all good actors naturally rely on their instincts, and instinct is not something anyone can teach you. It may sound like a bit of a cliche, but you are always going to be the person you are, which in turn means that you will always make acting choices specific to your personality and interpretation of the world. And, in contrast, all techniques are about systematising - trying to work out some method that will apply to everyone, in order that their acting will improve. It's interesting - Stanislavski, who I guess started all this, seems to have wanted to come up with 'rules' (if you like)as to how you could invariably be a 'good' actor - to uncover the secret basis for what being a 'good' actor is about. But I think it's sometimes very hard to take some theoretical rules (that look beautifully logical on paper) and then apply them to your actual physical acting, and make them work.

    As to Meisner, I like it because it's an attempt to do away with too many rules, and there's a certain amount of free associating involved in it - it's all about forgetting that you're acting in a way, and embracing spontaneity. But then, that might just be another way of saying it's about trusting your instinct.

    But keeping skills honed never hurt anyone either :)

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 16
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    Good thread. I did the Actors Studio 8 week intensive earlier this year and one of the teachers was the 'king of Meisner'. He was a pretty evil guy when it came to breaking us down. Being a typical Scot I couldn't really cry much and got caught out 'pretending to cry' on camera! It took him 3 weeks but he finally found which buttons set me off and then proceeded to press all of them! He was great and one of my favourite teachers there - Kris Allen.

    Now I can genuinely cry at the drop of a hat using emotional recall etc etc... It really did open my eyes. The other good thing about the course in LA is that all the teachers taught in a different style, so once you got over the confusion, it was great to pick and choose what works for you.

    Thought I'd give my two penneth.

    H x

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 17
  • Blake J Askew

    Actor

    and thefact is that many people need to let go of "control". But at the same time, each person has thier own way of working..if the end result is that the job gets donwe....and well...then kudos.

    I dont like actors who impose thier ideas on people as the ONLY WAY. But one can learn from most techniques.And books.

    As a singer, I have found that there are many teachers out ther, but one has to embrace the natural physiology of the voice and how it works. If you ignore basic rules of the larynx and voice production, you wont have much of a career.

    Acting is not exactly something you can "pinpoint", so different thngs do work.

    I suppose this is why actors get cagey when other actors give them "notes". Its so subjtective and hard to detach.

    I do get concerned when some teachers become "guru" like and are emulated to that level though...it just makes me nervous and i want to run a mile.

    • 4th Aug 2006
    • 18
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    How did the course go?

    I see they're doing another in September but I can't make that one either! :-(

    Cheers

    Sue

    • 8th Aug 2006
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