Un/accredited drama schools

  • User Deleted

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    I started this conversation on someone else's thread but thought I would open it out to a wider audience for their opinion's.

    On joining spotlight i fully appreciate that they have a certain criteria so that its the more committed and professionally trained applicants that get through.

    However, I feel it restricts those that simply don't have the funds to apply for the more expensive schools/colleges which are in Spotlights list of schools/colleges that they accept.

    I am studying at the London School of Dramatic Arts which, even tho isn't accredited, I feel is more exclusive as they only accept a small group each year which allows the highly respected, fully qualified and industry professional teachers to give the student a more one and one learning experience.

    At the end of the course students will receive an advanced diploma in acting.

    My question is, should Spotlight allow applicants who have been taught from other schools/colleges outside of their list?

    And any other thoughts on this matter?

    Thanks

    • 19th Feb 2013
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  • User Deleted

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    I have a large number of issues with the whole un/accredited courses thing, as I chose my course as I was looking for somewhere that would offer me not just training in the art of acting, but training to enable me to succeed in this business when I graduated, things that weren't focused on in accredited course syllabi.

    The course I did wasn't accredited, yet I, and as far as I know everyone one my course who applied, had no issues getting onto Spotlight. By the time we were applying, we had, from our course alone, a number of theatre credits and a short film credit.

    • 15th Feb 2013
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  • Shante Campbell

    Actor

    I know exactly what you mean! I myself have just graduated from LSDA and me and my classmates continually debated the same issue? But it can be done! Especially once you have an agent or get a few jobs on your CV.

    Yes I completely agree with you that the acting world favours those with money, but it has been like that for years and years, it's up to our generation to change it...

    • 15th Feb 2013
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  • Jensen Freeman

    Actor

    Spotlight membership can be attained by other methods, eg, credits and other qualifying criteria. They do look at each application and can accept based on information that you provide in your application.

    It's not all text book ruling. Be sure to include as much information as possible and be able to provide evidence of info should they ask for verification.

    There are quite a few pros who never had any formal training, let alone from a listed accredited establishment, but satisfied other entry criteria.

    • 15th Feb 2013
    • 3
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    I just posted in response to Wesley's thread in the other post Getting An Agent. Firstly, you don't need drama-school training to get into Spotlight and, secondly, there is at least one accredited drama school which focusses on getting work. The one I chose gave me the knowledge and skill I needed to go out and get a job and not long after graduating I landed a paid stage job. Don't forget places like The Actors Centre and City Lit for short courses. Keep plugging away at building up a CV. Get a decent headshot that looks like you and a showreel, keep applying for paid work.

    • 16th Feb 2013
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  • Angharhad Owen

    Actor

    I'm 'untrained' whatevwr that is and entered the industry that way.. I had no problems with my spotlight application given that I had built up my professional credits and was a working actor when I applied, so its perfectly doable ... What you can't do is jump into sp

    • 16th Feb 2013
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  • Angharhad Owen

    Actor

    Sorry ...phone..cut myself off....I'm 'untrained' whatever that is and entered the industry that way.. Though i had been performing for over 20years.. had no problems with my spotlight application given that I had built up my professional credits and was a working actor when I applied, so its perfectly doable ... What you can't do is jump into spotlight with no training AND no experience and that's as it should be, I think.

    With that said I do of course contemplate drama schools still from a professional development perspective. I regularly attend drama school show cases and shows and open days just to see if I think its right for me.. For me personally the standard coming out of some of the uncredited schools seems very low with some really basic stage techniques over looked, that said some of the more elite accredited schools are pumping out very polished performers but who seem to have had all their instincts surpressed so much that its impossible to tell one performer from another sometimes

    • 16th Feb 2013
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  • User Deleted

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    Thank you to everyone, your views and opinions have been very helpful.

    • 16th Feb 2013
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  • Angharhad Owen

    Actor

    Just read my earlier comment back and it sounds a bit more harsh than was intended! Apologies I suppose all my point is, is there are no set roites into this industry all the courses advice etc etc will help of course but at the end of the day we all have to just jump into our canoes and get paddling!!!

    • 17th Feb 2013
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  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Every year roughly 380 actors graduate from a three year acting course accredited drama schools every single soliatary year. Thats not including PG/MA courses or any musical theatre students. That's a lot of actors to sift through. There must be a way for casting directors to separate the wheat from the chaff.

    That's not saying that unaccredited courses aren't any good, its just to say that casting directors simply don't know. And with thousands of actors trained at schools they have heard of, there is next to no incentive to find out.

    Acting is a business and business is about branding. If someone doesn't recognise a brand they won't take the risk.

    Take a year, or two, and save up and go to an accredited school. Otherwise you might spend your career trying to convince people th

    • 18th Feb 2013
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  • Jensen Freeman

    Actor

    Casting directors look for specific characteristics in an actor when casting a role, that's the point. Whether you trained at a well established accredited school or did a part time course at a little known school, it's what you deliver in your audition that counts.

    A course will, or may be I should say, should... give you the basic grounding and a taste of the acting world with a good syllabus. Every actor is different. I could have spent £27'000 on a course I was offered at a very well known drama academy, instead, I opted to do the same course at a University for a quarter of the cost, receiving the same certificate. That was a choice I made. I've done alright for myself and continue to do so, and happy with the outcome I achieved. Not to mention saving myself around £18'000 in the process.

    You could be the very best at everything, doesn't mean you will get every audition you attend. That, is a decision only the casting team make.

    I always remember very wise words from a former tutor and they are: getting the audition is an achievement in itself, it means you are what the casting director is looking for. Its up to you to do the rest.

    • 19th Feb 2013
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  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Jensen, you went to Guildhall!

    • 19th Feb 2013
    • 11
  • Jensen Freeman

    Actor

    I received the Guildhall certificate through an alternate course :-) everything is possible! I was offered the chance of taking the Guildhall exam through my course. I like that you had a nosed at my profile to see though! Heh heh x

    • 19th Feb 2013
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  • Catherine Stobbs

    Actor

    I went to an unaccredited school and we all got straight into spotlight. I've no idea how!

    • 19th Feb 2013
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