Steve Hay

  • Actor
    Male / London
  • Ethnicity
    Caucasian
    Age Range
    39 - 49
    Height
    5' 10" (1m 78cm)
    Weight
    10st. 10lb (68kg)
    Hair Colour
    Brown
    Eye Colour
    Blue
    Build
    Slim

Reviews

YearReviewPublication
2012incarnates a Barrie both impish and sad, tormented and carrying a strange enthusiasm, in despair and terribly alive
Celine Albin-Faivre
rosesdedecembre.blogspot.co.uk
2012Steve Hay controlled the piece perfectly and used his rich vocal range to excellent effect.
Gwilym Scourfield
dailyinfo.co.uk

Credits

YearRole / TypeName of Production / DirectorCompany / Venue
2012 - 2020storyteller/director/casting
Rehearsed Reading
Short Stories Aloud
Sarah Franklin
Short Stories Aloud
Old Fire Station, Oxford
2008 - 2020patients
Role Play
GPNRO selection process roleplays
Tamsin Heatley
NHS south Central
Kassam Stadium, Oxford
2008 - 2020patient
Role Play
Communication skillsUniversity of Oxford
2020voice artist/narrator
Voiceover
Cancer Research UK film
Isabel Barker
Conran Design
2020Cheesemonger/narrator
Voiceover
Seriously
Su Kaur
Storyboard London
2019Scottish dwarf ADR voice artist
Voiceover
The Witcher
Vanessa Baker
Blend Audio/Hocus Pocus Productions
2019voice artist
Voiceover
Starling Bank
Phoebe Mead
Theobald Fox
2019Zebekiah
Film
The Book of Laws
Dan Lowenstein
TBZ Productions
Isle of Wight
2018Macbeth
Theatre
Macbeth
Sarah Berger
Orzu Arts/So and So Arts Club
National Academic Drama Theatre, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
2017 - 2018Dr Andrew Moir
Film (Short)
The Anatomist
Nicci Thompson
Crow House Projects
The Anatomy Rooms, Aberdeen and various, Aberdeenshire
2017 - 2018Minister
Film (Short)
The Hanging Branch
Shaun Hughes
Tripswitch/Factotum Productions
Crathes, Aberdeenshire
2018Richard
Film (Short)
Eazy Meets
Grace Williams
Aversion Films
Bath, UK
2018voice artist
Voiceover
Glenlivet Mood
Elizabeth Cowie
Louder Productions Ltd
2018voice artist/Wickerman
Voiceover
Alton Towers SW8
Victoria Munday
TBWA Manchester
2018ADR voice artist
Voiceover
Mary Queen of Scots
Josie Rourke
Focus Features
2018voice artist
Voiceover
Radisson Red Glasgow
Tom Heath
Brandcap
2018Series narrator
Voiceover
World's Wildest Holidays
Eddie Sharp
Kalel Productions/FiveStar
2017voice artist
Voiceover
Jura Journey
Tristan Dampney
John Knowles Ritchie
2016ADR voice artist
Voiceover
In Plain Sight
John Strickland
World Productions
2016Major Neil Lawson
Theatre
Too Long The Heart
Andy Corelli
Awkward Stranger
The Biscuit Factory, Edinburgh
2016Steve/MAN/Judge
Theatre
Tomorrow Never Knows
Tania Higgins
The Oxford Triptych
Akademicki Ośrodek Inicjatyw Artystycznych (Academic Centre of Artistic Initiatives), Lodz, Poland
2016distillery guide
Commercial
Glenfiddich - Journey into the Mind of the Malt Master 360 VR
Danny Vaia
The Space Agency
2016Frank
Rehearsed Reading
Yellow Moon
Polly Tisdall
Ruskin Theatre Platforms
Ruskin Theatre
2016Danny
Theatre
Oh Danny Boy (Turning Leaves)
John Retallack
Rust and Stardust Productions
Old Fire Station, Oxford
2016ADR voice artist
Film (Feature)
Tommy's Honour
Jason Connery
Gutta Percha Productions
2015ADR voice artist
Voiceover
Macbeth
Justin Kurzel
See Saw Films
Warner Bros, De Lane Lea
2015Danny
Theatre
Oh Danny Boy (Turning Leaves)
John Retallack
Rust and Stardust Productions
Suite Grassmarket, Edinburgh Fringe
2015young Anthony
Theatre
Mercy
Jake Murray
So and So Arts Club/Frontier Productions - Ever Hopeful Rep season
So and So Arts Club
2015Roy
Rehearsed Reading
Two
John Retallack
Ruskin Theatre Platforms
Ruskin College, Oxford
2015Dr Vivien Houghton
Theatre
Collider
Katie Read
SatMatCo
Old Fire Station, Oxford
2015Dougie the homeless
Theatre
What I Do
Zoe Sharp
The One Festival
The Space Theatre
2014Father
Rehearsed Reading
This Child
John Retallack
Ruskin Theatre Platforms
Ruskin College, Oxford
2014Gypsy #1
TV
Outlander
Metin Huseyin
Sony/Starz/Tall Ship Productions
2014Danny
Rehearsed Reading
Oh Danny Boy
John Retallack
Ruskin Theatre Platforms
Ruskin College, Oxford
2014Steve
Film (Short)
You
Jim Quayle
Warpline Films
2014Dougie the homeless
Theatre
What I Do
Lucy Appleby
Rapid Write Response/Theatre 503
Theatre503
2014Prison psychiatrist
Film (Short)
A Quiet Courage
James Card
Thorny Devil Productions
2014Boxing fan
Film (Short)
The Corinthian
Mark Brown
Brainehownd Films
2014Butler
Music Video
Candy Says / Chad
Beckim Mala
Cork on the fork productions
2013various/deviser
Theatre
Hidden Spire II
Lizzie McBain
Crisis/Arts at the Old Fire Station
Old Fire Station
2013Russ
Theatre
Spare Prick
Joe Graham
Balancing Act
Old Fire Station, Oxford
2013JM Barrie
Theatre
The Mythmakers
Sarah Berger
So and So Arts Club in association with PurpleHays Productions
New York International Fringe Festival 2013
2013Tom
Film (Short)
Worst Date Ever
Nicki Perkins
Eavesdrop films
2013Gronar
Film (Feature)
The Search for Simon
Martin Gooch
Gothic Manor Ltd
2013Gallery guard, various eccentrics
Music Video
Candy Says / Favourite Flavour
Becks
Cork on the fork productions
2012 - 2013various/deviser
Theatre
Hidden Spire
Lizzie McBain
Crisis/Arts at the Old Fire Station
Old Fire Station, Oxford
2012 - 2013Terry
Film (Feature)
Heckle
Robbie Moffat
Palm Tree
2012 - 2013DCI Malcolm Cullen
Film (Short)
Shrinking Violet
James Card
Thorny Devil Productions
2012Sgt Jack McCracken
Theatre
Dalgety by David Greig
Cecily Boys
Old Bomb Theatre/Theatre Uncut
The Bussey Building, Peckham
2012boxer
Music Video
Candy Says (formerly Little Fish) / Melt into the Sun
Becks
Cork on the fork productions
A barn in Bicester
2012Senior Tutor Dr Adrian Wilson
Theatre
High Table - An Oxford Trilogy
Stuart Lee
Oxford Playwrights
Old Fire Station, Oxford
2012JM Barrie
Theatre
The Mythmakers, the unexpected friendship of JM Barrie and Scott of the Antarctic
Kenneth Michaels
Celtic Circle
Charing Cross Theatre WC2N 6NL
2011performer
Theatre
Living Word Walks Didcot
Rebecca Mordan
Scary Little Girls/The Theatre, Chipping Norton
Didcot
2011performer
Theatre
Living Word Walks Chipping Norton
Rebecca Mordan
Scary Little Girls/The Theatre, Chipping Norton
Chipping Norton
2011Tommy
Theatre
Quiz Night at the Britannia
Tania Higgins
The Deck Theatre
upstairs at Copa (Oxfringe 2011)
2011Mal Norman
Theatre
The Pillbox
Tom Blackmore
Top Edge Productions
Bampton Village Hall
2011driver with bald tyre
Commercial
McConechy's Tyres
Alasdair MacCuish
Bees Nees
Glasgow
2011Derek
Theatre
Subs
Hamish MacDougall
Opera Up Close
The Cock Tavern Theatre. Kilburn
2010sonneteer
Theatre
Sonnet Walks Chipping Norton
Rebecca Mordan
Scary Little Girls/The Theatre, Chipping Norton
Chipping Norton
2010Ken Bunten
Theatre
Fun Run
Joe Graham
Balancing Act
Old Fire Station, Oxford
2010Luka
Film (Feature)
The Oracle
Shamus Maxwell
Cruellest Month
2010Captain Simon Jones
Theatre
Never Tell Them (OXfringe 2010)
Stuart Lee
Front Row Productions
New Road Baptist Church, Bonn Square, Oxford
2008 - 2010Poet/host/swashbuckler
Theatre
Jam on That?
Steve Hay
Purple Hays Productions
The Jam Factory, Oxford
2009Various characters
Rehearsed Reading
Guilty Parties
wr. Simon Farquhar
independent
2009Silhouette
Corporate
The Identity ProjectMission 21
The Wellcome Collection, London
2009Dr Vivien Houghton
Theatre
Collider
Katie Read
The Oxford Saturday Matinee Club
EOCC
2009Robert
Theatre
Storm/Pork
Joe Austin
The Oxford Playhouse
Burton Taylor Theatre
2009Henry
Film (Short)
After
Chris Sinclair
Taxis Seventeen
2009Barry
Musical
A Fistful of Mondays
Joe Graham
Balancing Act
Old Fire Station Studio, Oxford
2009Reg Armitage
Theatre
A Last Belch for the Great Auk
Sarah Dodd
MakeSpace
Old Fire Station Studio, Oxford
2009Man
Rehearsed Reading
The Intricate Workings of a Sherbet Lemon
Sarah Dodd
Playbites
Oxford Playhouse
2008Kyle Graffin
Film (Short)
The Reunion
Mike Stuart
Doorway Films
2008Reg Armitage
Rehearsed Reading
A Last Belch for the Great Auk
Sarah Dodd
MakeSpace
Oxford Playhouse
2008Charlie
Film (Short)
The Cheap Hit
Shamus Maxwell
Saxon Films
2008Captain Simon Jones
Theatre
Never Tell Them/Tri-umph
Joe Austin
The Oxford Playhouse
Burton Taylor Theatre
2008Lion tamer
Music Video
Long Insiders / All the tears I've cried
Tim Winter
Atomic
2008Andy
Film (Short)
The Pianist
Adam Hoare
UnGnome Productions
2008various staff
Corporate
Corporate training videoSomerfield
2008Baxendale
Rehearsed Reading
Reflections in a Distorting Mirror
Rio Fanning
OAN
Burton Taylor theatre
2007talking head
Corporate
Sony Trade showMade in the Shade
2007psychotic clown
Film (Short)
Encouragement
Ben Martin
Cautious Horses
2007Bert
Theatre
Every Mother's Son
Sarah Dodd
The Oxford Playhouse
Burton Taylor Theatre
2007Vic
Film (Feature)
Inside Blue
Shamus Maxwell
Saxon Films
2006John
Film (Feature)
An' Me Wi' A Bad Leg Tae
Angeline Ferguson
Bad Leg Productions
Glasgow
2005Shane
Film (Student)
Drinkypoos
Rodger Griffiths
Royal Conservatoire of Scotland
Glasgow
2005Chorus
Theatre
The Fence in its Thousandth Year
Howard Barker
The Wrestling School
Oxford Playhouse
2005Various
Theatre
Glass Onion
Steve Hay/Pete House
PS Theatre
Holyrood Tavern, Edinburgh Festival
2003Isaac
TV
Ultimate Force II
Richard Holthouse
Assembly Film and Television
1999Private Billy Meechan
Theatre
In That Summer of Sweet 16
Jane Clark
I'm a Camera
Old Red Lion, Islington
1998Legal secretary
Film (Feature)
The Tichborne Claimant
David Yates
The Bigger Picture Company
1998Sam Nicholls/Dr Delane
Theatre
Merriel the Ghost Girl
David Halliwell
Wychwood Depiction Engine
Charlbury Arts Festival
1997Private Billy Meechan
Theatre
The House
David Halliwell
Wychwood Depiction Engine
Charlbury Arts Festival
  • Education

    YearQualificationWhere
    2001two-week intensive film acting courseThe Actors Centre - The Actors Cut
    19942 yr. ActingOxford School of Drama

    Additional Skills

    Juggling, poetry, journalism, most sports, comedy (former member of The Awkward Silence, currently one half of Wilson and MacLoon

    Additional Information

    Press reviews (edited extracts)

    The Mythmakers New York International Fringe Festival 2013, August 9-25, 2013. A So and So Arts Club Production in association with PurpleHays Productions. Dir. Sarah Berger

    Friendships can be tricky, especially when people are as seemingly different as J.M. Barrie, author of Peter Pan, and R. F. Scott, the Antarctic explorer. They are the subject of The Mythmakers, a UK import for the New York International Fringe Festival, now playing at Teatro Latea August 20, 24 and 25.

    Written by Rose MacLennan Craig and Richard White, The Mythmakers addresses the relationship between two men at the top of their game.

    The intimate 70-minute production examines an Edwardian friendship loaded with affection and respect, but kept at a certain emotional distance. Barrie and Scott are adept at articulating their passions, but less successful at dipping into the subtle recesses of the heart.

    At first glance, they may seem an unusual pair; but their relationship, portrayed with great feeling by Steve Hay (Barrie) and Jonathan Hansler (Scott), is quietly engaging.

    Both were celebrities in pre-World War I England. Barrie had once dreamed of becoming an explorer, but pursued a literary career instead, to great acclaim. Conversely, Scott, heralded from his first South Pole expedition, longed to be a writer, but family pressure pushed him into a naval career.

    What they share is a passion for adventure; though Barrie's exists in the realm of imagination. He dreams of accompanying Scott to the South Pole, which the explorer describes as a place of "terrible beauty" with "ice as architecture." Scott is poetic in his imagery, lured by the dangers of the icy kingdom. Barrie is envious of his fearlessness. Yet Mythmakers, nicely directed by Sarah Berger, records the moment they became estranged, just before Scott left for his final, deadly journey.

    In fact, when Scott died in 1912, Barrie was heartbroken. Among Scott's undelivered letters, found when his body was discovered, a poignant one to Barrie read: "I never met a man in my life whom I admired and loved more than you..."

    Today, movies often reduce male friendship to a silly bromance of boys who refuse to grow up. Barrie and Scott remind us that adult friendships are based on deep, abiding connections. And though both are better at discussing big themes versus their respective domestic travails, The Mythmakers provides a peek into the mind-set of two compelling figures.

    Fern Siegel, Huffington Post 19/8/2013

    “You complete me,” is a sentence JM Barrie and Captain Scott never utter in the short play, The Mythmakers, and I am sure also never uttered in their real lives. But it is certainly how they felt.

    The Mythmakers is a one act bio play that explores the relationship between the author of the iconic, Peter Pan, JM Barrie, played by Steve Hay, and the iconic Antarctic explorer, Captain Robert Scott, played by Jonathan Hansler.

    On a minimalist set of white sheets, a small tent of white, two chairs and a steamer trunk Hay, Hansler, and the director, Sarah Berger, bring to life the self-doubt and longings of Barrie and Scott. The play opens after Scott's frozen death at the South Pole with Barrie reading aloud apologetic letters he has written to Scott but never sent. Scott, large and masculine, looms in the background, unseen by the diminutive and boy-like Barrie, and speaks to Barrie of his love for him and his hurt after their estrangement.

    The play (like I am certain Barrie and Scott themselves) is extremely verbal and intelligent, so much so that I needed a slower pace. There is so much revealed about these two men, who lived such grand and large lives, that I wanted to savor, to ruminate on. For that I needed more build up to each climax, their very personal revelations, and more space between the one and the next. Hay and Hansler play their parts with great verbal ability and both excellently inhabit the physicality of the famous men they play.

    The Mythmakers tells the story of two great men who find in each other a missing side of themselves. Barrie, stunted at age 14 physically and emotionally, longs to fly, to voyage, to have adventures, to have children (sons). Scott, large, an explorer by default not choice, with a wife he feels he can not hold on to, men whose lives rest in his hands, and a secret desire to write, longs to fly, to be admired for his intellect rather than his prowess, to live the comfortable life of the English gentleman.

    Barrie's and Scott's love for each other was not the love that dare not speak its name. It was the love, respect and admiration of a now lost ancient form of deep friendship that can teach us, living in these times of electronic friendships that ask little of us, and that from which we dare not demand anything, that there once was a time when friendships mattered profoundly.The Mythmakers, Written by Rose MacLennan Craig and Richard White for Celtic Circle; Directed by Sarah Berger; Produced for The So and So Arts Club in Association with PurpleHays Productions. Cast: Steve Hay (JM Barrie), Jonathan Hansler (Captain RF Scott).

    Constance Rodgers, Usher Nonsense. 11/8/2013

    The Mythmakers, a two-hander by Rose MacLennan Craig and Richard White, explores the friendship between the author of Peter Pan, J. M. Barrie and celebrity explorer, R. F. Scott. Produced by The So and So Arts Club and Purple Hays Productions, the play is a selection for the 2013 New York International Fringe Festival running now through August 25th.

    Just as Scott returned from his famed “Discovery Expedition” to the Antarctic, Barrie made a big splash with his play about the boy who wouldn’t grow up. The two friends were both adventurers: one in the literal sense and one in the literary sense. The play depicts how Barrie, marred by his weak constitution, longed to be a literal adventurer, while Scott longed to be a writer. The two see their dreams in each other’s lives and seem to be two sides of the same coin. A falling out leaves the friendship forever broken when Scott parishes on his second Antarctic expedition.

    These figures who were prominent 100 years ago have been largely lost to us as celebrities. This play doesn’t exactly reintroduce us to them in terms of their legacy, but simply explores a friendship as the two argue back and forth concerning Barrie’s desire to write a play about Scott’s adventures. The draw to this play is its subjects, but their greatest points of interest are not revealed. Steve Hay as Barrie, looks right in period sportsman’s garb and bushy mustache while giving a clear Scottish accent. Jonathan Hansler as Scott looks properly rugged and ready for exploration. The two have a maturity in their performance that lends credibility to the presentation of these legends.

    Michael D Jackson. Examiner.com 19/8/2013

    Quiz Night at the Britannia, by Stuart Lee, Upstairs at Copa, through June, July and August 2012. The Deck Theatre. Dir. Tania Higgins

    Stuart Lee’s play offers a very different night out. If you have an old-fashioned mind set of ‘going to the theatre to be entertained’, you will enjoy it as a thought-provoking look at the demise of much of our pub culture. If, however, you like the pub quiz and a great night out with friends, the evening will really take off and you’ll become fully involved.The upstairs bar of the Copa has been used to its best potential by the talented Tania Higgins. She has directed a competent set of actors, too. Principally, Steve Hay gives another thoughtful and multi-layered performance as the wise-cracking regular, Tommy. Sarah Wilkins, as the troubled Brenda, hostess of the ‘Brittania’ provides him with a brilliant foil. Their duologues are rich in humour. So, too are Lucy Hoult and Adie Gargan, who play middle class toffs with huge energy, fun and enough integrity to avoid caricature. It is a very entertaining evening. You may even win the quiz prize. Not many theatre experiences offer that!

    A really fun and different type of theatre - a play about a pub quiz night where the audience is part of the play and also gets to do a quiz. And it works! Gathering pace as the evening went on, it is Steve Hay’s performance as the rough layabout that really moves the audience at the end.

    If you want a great night out that’s a bit different - go for this.

    Daily Information, July 2012

    Short Stories Aloud. Curated by Sarah Franklin. Old Fire Station. May 29, 2012

    It is a hot evening and we’re right at the top of The Old Fire Station. Not the most comfortable setting to listen to ‘Stories Aloud’. It is a measure of just how well these programmes are put together that disbelief is immediately suspended and a capacity audience is transported away on the literary power of the spoken word. Choosing the selection and hosting it is clearly a lot to do with its success. Sarah Franklin was hosting her third meeting. She had a chosen for us a menu of startlingly fresh and original stories read by two accomplished actors, Steve Hay and Julie Mayhew.

    Caroline Smailes’ book, ‘Freaks’ was the source for ‘Magic Beans’ and ‘Before I lost You’ - touching and humorous with much to consider. Ben Johncock’s short stories include ‘The Rocket Man’ a hauntingly futuristic adventure told from a child’s perspective. Steve Hay controlled the piece perfectly and used his rich vocal range to excellent effect.

    After a short interval, we heard ‘Soup’ and ‘She Sees Two’, culminating in a longer story from Rebecca Makkai. Rebecca is a hugely talented American writer who has had stories regularly chosen for the ‘Best American Short Stories’ anthology. Julie Mayhew’s flawless reading of this masterpiece of concise analysis of contemporary American life was a splendid climax to the readings.

    The format is deceptively simple - six short stories, refreshments and afterwards a chance to ask questions of the writers. In an era of I-Pods, I-Pads and electronic entertainment of all kinds, it is fair to wonder why it should work at all. It reaches us all, because it is delivered with professional skills and with a social ambience that is universally involving. It simply could not be more accessible or engaging. If you enjoyed being read to as a child, you’ll enjoy it even more now. Many of the people present had been to previous meetings. Many hadn’t, but I suspect most will not wish to miss the next offering of literary delights on June 26th. (This will also be at The Old Fire Station at 7.30pm)

    Gwilym Scourfield, Daily Information 6/12/2012

    The Mythmakers, the unexpected friendship of JM Barrie and Scott of the Antarctic, by Rose MacLennan Craig and Richard White, Charing Cross Theatre, WC2N 6NL. March 18-25, 2012. Celtic Circle. Dir. Kenneth Michaels.

    I expected nothing of the actor who, by the unique power of the theatre, was about to become Barrie in this place, but a certain sense of friendship and respect was soon born in me when last Sunday I began to witness the work of Steve Hay. He incarnates a Barrie both impish and sad, a Barrie both tormented and carrying a strange enthusiasm, a Barrie in despair and terribly alive, displaying his personal interior ghosts--thus becoming one himself at least on the symbolic level.

    Steve Hay serves Barrie with a great deal of honesty and a certain clear perspective.

    Celine Albin-Faivre, author and JM Barrie expert, rosesdedecembre.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/mythmakers-londres-2012.html?m=1

    Quiz Night at the Britannia, by Stuart Lee, upstairs at Bar Copa, June 15-17, 2011. The Deck Theatre. Oxfringe 2011. Dir. Tania Higgins.

    Quiz Night at the Britannia is now finished. But if in future if you see anything by the writer Stuart Lee then go along. If you don't, you'll miss a script bursting with originality, verve and insight - whatever the genre.

    This particular vehicle for Stuart's talents was a comedy. For its success - which was great, judging by the enthusiastic applause at the end - a deft script might have been enough but the words were enhanced by splendid acting, not least from Steve Hay (as Tommy) and Hannah Morrell (Brenda).

    So - what was Quiz Night actually about? Well, it consisted of a quiz, set against a series of background squabbles and crises: Brenda with her battles against brewery changes; Tommy, Joe and Berne fighting the Faceless Bureaucrats and all the time there is a Public Inquiry in the new hotel round the corner. Back-handers and politicians, the Big Society and Coalition Government (with its record 12 U-turns so far). This was a very human drama set against the comedy that is politics.

    Excellent work - well-directed by Tania Higgins - and a credit to all involved.

    Chris Sivewright, Daily Information. 20/06/11

    Quiz Night at the Britannia was original, interesting and very entertaining. All actors gave wonderful performances, in particular Steve Hay as Tommy was excellent. The dialogue was a thought-provoking and a timely assessment of political ideals - big society - and how it impacts on the individual.

    The story is presented in a staccato of short scenes all in the same setting, the pub, jumping from various crises affecting the characters each in his/her own way. The authentic setting of the Copa Bar enhanced the performance considerably. Although genuinely funny - I laughed lots - the play was at times quite sad as it was very easy to identify with the plight of the characters. You empathise with them and imagine what will become of them after the play has finished and the adjustments they will have to make. All in all very entertaining but also plenty to think and talk about after the laughing stops.

    Daily Information, 01/07/11

    Subs by R J Purdey, Cock Tavern, Kilburn, January 5-29, 2011. Good Night Out Presents. Dir: Hamish MacDougall

    The Cock Tavern Theatre is getting good at spotting hits.

    This is a tale of two men: wiry, whisky-fuelled chief sub Derek (Steve Hay) and his 'dour from the Gower' Welsh deputy Finch (Michael Cusick). Drop a quietly ambitious junior and a confident female freelancer onto the page and the stage is set for a showdown.

    Hay and Cusick are worthy sparring partners but then they do get the best lines.

    It's an entertaining 90 minutes.

    Nancy Groves, What's On Stage

    Light-hearted entertainment with a touch of drama.

    This is reticent of Kreon's fall from grace in Greek theatre but for a more modern and modest era.

    It is this fall from grace that provides the drama where the audience really did seem to lean forward and come into the action.

    Steve Hay as the Chief Sub-editor, Derek, handled the complexities of a likeable character turned power happy and finally falling with grace with skill and ease.

    These moments and indeed these relationships are the strength of the piece.

    It is within these relationships that Director Hamish MacDougall's eye for detail really shines as the dominant male characters lose their strength. He captures the dynamics of the office environment beautifully not even letting it slip in scene changes that make even the most simple of office activities watchable.

    Vicky Bell, The Public Reviews

    Derek, one of life's losers, is the chief-sub. With a depressed wife, two children and empty hopes of a promotion, it is no wonder he takes it out on his deputy. Finch, the deputy sub, is obnoxious, lazy and terrified of women: so when he learns a woman will be joining the team he is more than a little flustered.

    Hamish MacDougall's production is fast-paced, well staged and captures the politics and in-fighting of an office.

    Steve Hay as Derek has a good turn as the hopeless boss and Finch's sparring partner.

    It is an enjoyable evening of banter, in-fighting and politics - well worth a trip if you've not already had a day of that at the office.

    Elizabeth Davies, Kilburn Times

    Fun Run, by Joe Graham, Old Fire Station, George Street, Oxford. May 18-22, 2010. Balancing Act Productions. Dir: Joe Graham

    The office sets the scene for Fun Run, a play that weaves office politics with issues of relationships and sexual frustration. Steve Hay skillfully navigated the role of the moody manager Ken who at one point spectacularly gets butt naked. He brought some poignant moments and successfully grounded the comic premise of the other characters. The play descended into betrayal, scandal and explosive sexual tension in an uplifting ending that left the audience apparently titillated. Pete (The Temp) Bearder, 26/05/2010. Daily Information.

    Fun Run was just that. A funny, fast-paced romp with some excellent characterisations from Steve Hay, Katie Mansfield, James Card, Sam Mansfield and Louise Cobb. All the actors excelled at delivering farce, but Steve Hay had the greater challenge of ensuring a darker under current throughout both acts, which he delivered in an appropriately measured manner amidst the wackiness of the design crowd. An enjoyable and memorable evening in the final weeks of the Old Fire Station. MAF, 27/05/2010. Daily Information.

    This was a good old-fashioned British farce, pulled off by an accomplished cast. The characters were larger than life as one would expect in such a play, though Steve Hay managed to engender genuine sympathy for his character (Ken) who has to tackle genuine problems whilst around him chaos breaks out as his staff attempt to advertise, and then take part in, a fun run. Daily Information, 26/5/2010

    Never Tell Them, by Stuart Lee, New Road Baptist Church, Bonn Square, Oxford. March 24-27, 2010. Part of Oxfringe 2010. Front Row Productions. Dir: Stuart Lee

    Set in the aftermath of the First World War, Never Tell Them, by Stuart Lee, certainly had its humorous elements. It begins with a woman consulting a medium. He thinks she wants to contact her fallen husband. Simon Holden-White was hilarious as 'Professor' Bailey, while Hannah Morrell as Celia the bewildered wife brought great pathos to this fundamentally tragic story of what we now call survivor guilt. Her husband Captain Jones (Steve Hay) was powerfully played with honesty and strength. Several cunning plot twists kept me on the edge of my seat. It's a complex piece, which the accomplished company brought to eerie life. Angie Johnson 01/04/2010 Oxford Times

    The taut, atmospheric play, set in 1918 ... calls for sustained, deeply-felt performances. Hannah Morrell, Simon Holden-White, Steve Hay and Michael Fraser do that effortlessly. If you like theatre that makes the hairs stand up on the back of your neck, it's for you.

    Daily Info April 2010

    Collider by Shaun McCarthy, East Oxford Community Centre, Saturday November 14, 2009. The Oxford Saturday Matinee Club. Dir: Katie Read

    As Collider opens, Dr Cydney Lavelle (Holly King), a key scientist working on the Large Hadron Collider experiment, is meeting American evangelist Pastor Nathanial Goodman (James Card). In the background, wild-haired physicist Vivien Houghton (Steve Hay) obsessively practises a juggling act with some apples. Things get much more entertainingly complicated when the Pastor's wife Martha (Amy Enticknap) appears. With her gyrating body and curve-hugging clothes, she is not the obvious wife for a pastor from North Carolina.

    Relationships collide, as problems with the Collider itself mount up. McCarthy writes well, and has a good ear for a telling one-liner. If his play has a fault, it's that he tackles too many issues almost simultaneously: male chauvinism, racism, science versus religion, transparency, world poverty, and - of course - sex, they all get an airing during Collider's one-hour running time. But that's so much better than a single point, hammered home time and time again. Above all, McCarthy is extremely good at moving relationships in unexpected directions, with humour.

    The play was very well served by the professional cast, working under Katie Read's direction. Using only simple props, and no stage lighting, atmosphere and characterisations were expertly established. Altogether, the production was an auspicious start for this new venture. Giles Woodforde, 19/11/2009 Oxford Times

    A Fistful of Mondays by Joe Graham, Old Fire Station Studio, Oxford, June 30 to July 4, 2009. Balancing Act. Dir: Joe Graham

    A Fistful of Mondays is very well scripted and choreographed with excellent casting, in particular Barry the Barman (Steve Hay) and Tom Jones (Sam Mansfield) the karaoke singer (no, not that one). The performances from all eight actors were flawless, funny and the cast had good chemistry between them. My favourite scene was when Barry caught Tom cheating on him with the Munching Mule and storming off in a huff with his plastic cactus (you really have to see it to appreciate it) - a really well scripted scene and the funniest of the show. The subplot running through the play was the loss of the local pub and social club in favour of the cheap chains springing up all over the country, and Barry's battle to fight the local rival chain to keep the social club open. The audience loved the show and were engaged throughout. Marie Jones, 01/07/09, Daily Information

    A feel-good musical about a line-dancing group has burst onto the Oxford stage. A Fistful of Mondays follows the trials and tribulations of the club who meet at Walbeswick Sports and Social Club every Monday night. Throughout the action the cast entertain with line-dancing routines and rousing classic songs from artists such as Johnny Cash and Shania Twain. They clearly enthused their audience into clapping along and whooping in all the right places - despite the tropical heat in the theatre.

    Barry (Steve Hay), the club's barman, is a grumpy Scot determined to get the punters to buy drinks at his club rather than at his rival the nearby Munchin' Mule pub. Hay plays the witty, sardonic and astute bar-tender in a brilliantly deadpan way, making Barry one of the most comic and memorable characters.

    There are some very funny lines and scenarios which provoke laughter from the audience throughout the show. Ros Miles, Oxford Times, July 2, 2009

    A Last Belch for the Great Auk, by David Halliwell. Old Fire Station Studio, Oxford, April 1 and 2, 2009. Makespace Productions. Dir: Sarah Dodd

    A birdwatcher and a model are forced to confront their prejudices in David Halliwell's off-the-wall comedy A Last Belch for the Great Auk. Reginald Armitage, an ornithologist studying the long extinct Great Auk, sub-lets the flat of model Dymphne Pugh-Gooch while she is in New York. She writes to explain she is to return earlier than expected and his imagination is thrown into a frenzy. When we first meet Dymphne it is as a figment of Reg's fevered brain. She is unbelievable snooty, spoilt and stupid, a wholly two-dimensional stereotype. Near the start of the play Reg also makes an appearance in the mind of Dymphyne. He is a complete bore whose only joy in life seems to be the lack of pleasure he gets from being outside in the cold waiting for his life's only excitement, the appearance of a rare bird. Of course these are their preconceived ideas made into physical entities. These crude imagined versions of themselves meet three times and engage in blazing rows before the real characters finally meet. Happily, the actual Reg and Dymphne are infinitely more likeable than their notions of each other, and the pair strike up a kind of friendship. But when the real characters fall out, dialogue used by their imagined selves is repeated in their argument.

    The piece is well written, clever and laugh out loud funny.

    Steve Hay is every bit the cardigan-clad Reg, extolling with gusto his views on women, models, frivolity and the joy of birds, in broad Scottish tones. Alexa Brown effortlessly transforms herself from the awful imaginary Dymphne to a sympathetic real Dymphne, who is unpretentious and has the same problems as anyone else. The spirited performances make the production, by Oxford company MakeSpace, a fun and thought-provoking watch. Rosalind Miles, Oxford Times 16/4/2009

    It is a testimony to the strength of Oxford's emerging Fringe festival, that it is providing opportunities for artists around the city to bring to life projects which otherwise may have remained hidden. A Last Belch for the Great Auk is one such example. Written by David Halliwell (he of Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs) this was a piece that possibly would have never seen the light of day if it wasn't for the enthusiasm of Steve Hay, a friend of Halliwell's, who encouraged Sarah Dodd to take up the production for the Oxford Fringe.

    The play rests on a simple pretense - an ornithologist, Reginald Armitage (Hay), trying to finish his life-time study on the long extinct Great Auk, thinks he has landed on his feet by finding a short- term rent on a London flat; only to discover that the flat's owner, the wonderfully-named model Dymphne Pugh-Gooch (played by Alexa Brown), is coming back unexpectedly to live there. Yet this simple story becomes a multi-perspective narrative as we alternate between the real characters, and how they imagine their counterparts to be, until eventually prejudices and preconceptions collide when the two meet at the flat. Viewpoints are challenged, dismissed, and then re-emerge as the two get to know each other.

    This was a wonderfully funny and engaging play, and a debt of gratitude is owed to all the cast and production team for bringing it to the public. The ever-versatile Hay balanced the righteous indignation of the academic confronted by the fashion world with a dry cynicism. He was matched by an equally strong performance by Alexa Brown who pulled off the very difficult task of playing the imagined Dymphne to its full dreadful effect, and then creating genuine sympathy for the real one. The sparring between the two presented some first-class comic moments. Credit must also go to Sarah Dodd's direction on timing, and also for keeping the narrative moving despite the numerous short scenes and jump-cuts. Stuart D Lee, Oxford Prospect

    What starts as slightly stilted action between Steve Hay's exaggerated Scottish bird-lover and Alexa Brown's poised but irritating English model, soon relaxes into an engaging and believable discourse. Hyperbole being a key feature of A Last Belch for the Great Auk, the reason for this over-action of each stereotype becomes clear when we realise that the script is making slick and fast-paced switches between reality and imagination. Brown and Hay successfully distinguish between their different 'selves', displaying an interesting progression in their relationship during the one act and providing what becomes a brief yet entertaining glimpse of our worst habits, our flaws, and our intolerances. The tangents of the Great Auk and the life of a fashion model add to the comedy of Halliwell's script, and allow the actors to enjoy the potential of this endearing and amusing piece. Emily Shirtcliff, Daily Information

    A challenging two-handed one act play which intrigues its audience by presenting two different perceptions of a situation.

    Steve Hay is Reg Armitage, a slightly curmudgeonly Scottish ornithologist who finds himself living in model Dymphne Pugh Gooch's flat whilst she is away. Unfortunately Dymphne, beautifully played by beautiful Alexa Brown, needs to reclaim her living space sooner than expected and the two find themselves sharing the flat.

    David Halliwell's play might be examining an existential theme but at least it has enough wit to hold the audience rather than baffling them entirely. Sarah Dodd's production is simply staged with little more than a couple of chairs, a table, two plinths and some white lines to define the space and she is served well by strong performers who have to deliver some fairly hefty monologues alongside the more snappy dialogue as Reg, Dymphne, and thus the audience, discover their ideas of who they are and how the other will react are often way off mark.

    The actors were strong, with Steve Hay particularly good at engaging the audience, and although both characters could have been unlikeable they succeeded in winning over both us and each other. Ruth Curtis, www.remotegoat.co.uk

    Never Tell Them, by Stuart Lee. Burton Taylor Theatre, Oxford, September 2008. Dir: Joe Austin

    Never Tell Them, by Stuart Lee, concerns the rage for Spiritualism after the First World War. The distressed wife and the conman who exploits her predicament are skillfully acted by Jo Myddleton and Cymon Snow, and the most challenging role, that of Captain Jones, is taken by Steve Hay and carried off very convincingly. Julia Gasper, Oxford Prospect

    Stuart Lee's 50-minute play Never Tell Them takes us back to the aftermath of World War One. A gripping performance is solicited by Director Joe Austin from Steve Hay who as Captain Simon Jones struggles with the guilt of surviving the battle. A strong chemistry is built up between Hay and on stage wife played by Jo Myddelton who seeks the aid of eccentric medium Professor Brailey (Cymon Snow) to try and connect her husband to his fallen comrades. Lita Doolan, Daily Info, Oxford

    Glass Onion, Hollyrood Tavern, Edinburgh Festival August 2005. PS Theatre. Dir: Steve Hay, Pete House

    They introduced the Beatles to a new generation. Like two mates in a bedsit, this was like a Beatles appreciation society. Ultimately, a good thing! The admiration was truly sincere. Three Weeks Daily

    In That Summer of Sweet 16 by David Halliwell. Old Red Lion Theatre. I'm A Camera. Dir: Jane Clark

    Subtle, expectation-denying exploration of the tension between the need to speak and the pressures to repress the horrors of war. It makes for thought-provoking, theatre. Meticulously directed by Janey Clarke and acted by an all-round strong cast. Hero of the piece is Steve Hay, a convincing Private Billy Meechan, who grows from bullying yet likeable rabble-leader to shell-shocked victim. Barbara Lewis, The Stage

    The psychotic Scot who can't wait to kill more Jerries rails against the doctor who diagnoses him as shellshocked. Nick Curtis Evening Standard

    Steve Hay as Billy Meechan is a splenetic Scot randy to get back to the killing fields of northern France. Robert Lloyd Parry. Highbury & Islington Express

    About me

    OUTLANDER on Starz (US) and Amazon Prime (UK)

    Host of JOURNEY INTO THE MIND OF THE MALT MASTER

    (Glenfiddich 360VR campaign)

    Voice artist on Jason Connery’s TOMMY’S HONOUR and Justin Kurzel’s MACBETH

    HECKLE, SHRINKING VIOLET and A QUIET COURAGE premieres at CANNES

    THE MYTHMAKERS - official selection NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL FRINGE FESTIVAL

  • Skills

    Skin Colour
    • White
    Accents (International)
    • Dublin
    • Irish
    Experienced In
    • Comedy
    • Commercials
    • Corporate
    • Film (Professional)
    • Film (Student)
    • Motion Capture
    • Music Videos
    • Presenting
    • Radio
    • Rehearsed Readings
    • Roleplay
    • Theatre (Fringe)
    • Theatre (Professional)
    • TIE/TYA
    • TV
    • Voice Over
    Interested in
    • Comedy
    • Commercials
    • Corporate
    • Film (Professional)
    • Film (Student)
    • Music Videos
    • Presenting
    • Radio
    • Rehearsed Readings
    • Roleplay
    • Theatre (Fringe)
    • Theatre (Professional)
    • Theatre (Touring)
    • TV
    • Voice Over
    Organisation Memberships
    • BECTU (UK)
    • Equity
    • PACT (UK)
    Accents (UK)
    • Aberdeen
    • Ayrshire
    • Belfast
    • Dundee
    • Edinburgh
    • Fife
    • Glasgow
    • Hebrides
    • Highlands
    • Londonderry
    • Northern Irish
    • Scottish Highlands
    • Scottish, Central
    • Scottish, South
    • Scottish, Standard
    • Scottish, West Coast
    • Shetlands
    Accents (North American)
    • Californian
    • General American
    • New York City
    Hair Length
    • Short to Medium
    Specific Singing Skills
    • Tenor
    Perform nude?
    • Only Professionally
    Stage Combat Skills
    • Yes
    Driving Licences
    • Standard
    Facial Characteristics
    • Beard
    • Goatee
    • Moustache
    General Singing Skills
    • Chorus
    Native accent
    • Scottish
    DBS checked
    • Yes
    Character Types
    • Tough
    • Free-spirited
    • Scruffy
    • Intellectual
    • Villainous