How long?

  • Mary Gerardine Hooton

    Actor

    Just had my first TV audition, only a small part, but I know that its filming Aug/Sept time. How long should I expect to wait for a yes or no, as to wether I've got a part? Whats the average waiting time?

    • 20th Jul 2007
    • 18804
    • 7
  • Forbes KB

    Actor

    Shouldn't be much longer than a week, although if it isn't filming until Sep/Oct it may be longer particularly for the smaller parts.

    My theory on auditions is go in, do your stuff and forget about it! The phone may ring but it also may no and there is nothing worse than putting your life on hold, just in case.

    It's easier said than done, and my agent will definately agree on that point, but good advise all the same.

    ForbesKB

    • 18th Jul 2007
    • 1
  • Leila Reid

    Actor

    this is the one thing I find annoying sometimes it as really quick as in a couple of days however once I got told I got cast in a TV short, two months after I had auditioned. Then again sometimes they don't get in contact at all but if they will call you they normally will.

    hope that helps

    leila

    • 18th Jul 2007
    • 2
  • David Sullivan

    Actor

    Good advice Forbes. I've just had a final recall for the comedy side kick in a new high profile kids tv show that starts filming in September. I'm off to New York next week on my hols so am focusing on that rather than if I've got the job or not. Best to do the audition and try and forget about it. Theatre though... my agent phoned me yesterday for a recall for the tour of Dr Dolittle. I auditioned for the show 2 months ago and they're only now recalling me. I'd given up the ghost on that one as they start rehearsing in 3 weeks or so!

    • 18th Jul 2007
    • 3
  • Anthony Harwood

    Actor

    Hi,

    I agree with Leila.

    I once auditioned for a role in a tv series and it was about a month before I heard about a callback. Then it was about two months after that I heard I had a final callback and then about a week before it was confirmed I had the part. Went on to do three wonderful seasons, yay.

    Then there was another part I went for - another series lead (this was before the first example). I didn't hear anything for three months and then got called in to audition for another part for a one off episode for the same series. I didn't do another call back, they informed me two weeks later I got the job for the following fortnight and then the week of shooting, I was told I was needed the following week for a reprisal of my role.

    So I know this isn't much help but times can vary hugely. When you think you didn't get it, you receive a phone call and BANG you got it four months later, or maybe even the next day. It is just one of those industries.. but thats what makes you either love it or hate it.

    Best wishes on the results all the same.

    Anthony

    • 18th Jul 2007
    • 4
  • Rebecca Probyn

    Actor

    I agree with forbes (thats a first ;P )

    Just do the audition and forget about it, sometimes I know that is easier said than done!! but do try

    • 19th Jul 2007
    • 5
  • Mary Gerardine Hooton

    Actor

    Thanks for all the advice, had forgotton about the audition already!

    • 19th Jul 2007
    • 6
  • Lee Ravitz

    Actor

    As Forbes says, it can seem to us as actors that there is never a logic at work here. But of course there is - it's just we're not privy to its workings.

    Broadly, you can make the best judgements as to how long a (potential) reply might take, based upon what you know about the project.

    Something that is shooting/being performed very shortly will have to let you know quickly if you are involved in it. This is partly because of the obvious - the shoot or play is scheduled to take place two weeks on Friday, or whatever. Also, because if you are being cast at very short notice, it is often an indication that the rest of the particulars of this project is in place, and the casting of the final few actors will cement the set - up. In these sorts of instances, it is not as difficult for clear decisions to be reached by casting directors quickly.

    For casting in a project which might take place many months later, immediate response is far from predictable. The casting director may well have additional concerns besides your audition in, say, the two months prior to opening/filming. There may be a need to go through an extensive comparison of your performance with the performance of other members of the cast. The Casting Director may have a whole series of auditions to do in sequence, putting aside the notes written at the first audition until such time as everyone has been seen, and matters can be reassessed. This might conceivably take months to reach fruition. And, indeed, if the main emphasis is on securing 'name' actors for the main parts through extensive negotiation, then confirming who is playing in support is going to take a back seat for a while.

    Finally, although we don't like to ask, I suspect, how many parts do you think you sometimes get when a first choice has dropped out or proved unavailable? Suddenly, a call you didn't expect emerges, after several months, seemingly 'out of the blue'. Maybe you were being held on a reserve list, and it took a while for your time to come.

    Equally, if they thought you were tremednous, and they are now scared of losing you if they don't act fast, you may hear about a result within a matter of days. All of this is hugely variable, but not hugely unexpected.

    • 20th Jul 2007
    • 7