Tricky situation!

  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    OK, so I've been at my temp job for about two months. Its a rolling contract, the money is OK, and they let me have time off for auditions. Yesterday, the marketing manager asked me if I would do some voiceover work for their website (everyone knows Im an actor as well as a PA!). Last year some techy guy did the voice over and it was AWFUL (Ive heard it). Well, no-one has mentioned money, and I feel a bit awkward about asking. Ive got to work with these people, so if I ask for money and they say no, it could be really embarrassing. And to be fair, I'll do it whether they pay me or not, but it would be nice to be paid as well! I dont know who else would do it if I said no - whether it would be someone in the office, or a professional. Is it worth the potential embarrassment, or should I just accept gratefully as experience and a credit (never done voiceover work before).

    Help gratefully received!

    Lindsey x

    • 12th Apr 2011
    • 2009
    • 21
  • Lucy Drive

    Actor

    Hi Lindsey,

    I dont see any harm in politing asking if you will be paid for the job. If thay have to bring in a profesional anyway then they will have to pay them. Besides they will be getting a good job done with you as you are a profesional actress. You know the old saying, if you dont ask... :)

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 1
  • Peter Halpin

    Actor

    Absolutely ask for payment! I've been in a similar position and, as much as I totally understand your predicament, you are providing them with a service that is separate to your job there as a PA.

    They've asked you because of your skills as an actor and know that getting an in-house freebie is a bad idea! (Ooh how I hate companies that choose that option!!) You say how they're nice, understanding people so I think they'll be fine with you asking for payment. It's helping to promote they're company and if they'd gone elsewhere to source a voice artist they know it would cost, so why ask you to forfeit the fee?

    Good luck and welcome to the voicing world! :)

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 2
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Gosh, that is tricky.

    Tough to advise on this really because much depends on the type of people they are and the extent of your working relationship, and only you really know that.

    Perhaps try to find an opportunity to drop it lightly into the conversation when it's mentioned, make a joke/light remark of it. The sort that doesn't put their back up and doesn't put you in a bad light, whilst at the same time sowing the seed in their mind that the proper thing to do would be to offer some financial reward. Afterall, they are making use of your specific talents that don't seem to be part of your current working contract.

    How on earth you are going to do this, I don't know, but I wish you luck!

    Mark :)

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 3
  • Lucy Drive

    Actor

    Sometimes in these situations (especially with temping actors as we really appreciate the work) you can feel like if you ask for something you may be stepping across the line or pushing your luck but in all honesty, you have to give yourself a break. Acting is what you do, its your turf, you know how it works, so you have every right to expect payment for a job you know you should be getting paid for- if anything they will probably admire your business acumen and feel that your more likely to do a good job. It's like saying, look, you can go with the other girl that works here who has no experience in this field what so ever or go with a professional like me who will do a dam good job but will expect payment :)

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 4
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Don't get me wrong...

    Ideally, the honest, open, direct but friendly route would be best.

    I just thought, by your question, that perhaps this wasn't an option.

    The others are right, don't under-value your skills, if they got a professional (which you are) they would have to pay them, so they should really pay you.

    I guess you need to decide how important the money is and whether you want to risk burning bridges (if that was possible).

    But, again, don't sell yourself short!

    :)

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 5
  • Farah Sardar

    Actor

    It's up to you and how you feel, whether you ask if you can be paid or not. You mentioned you would do it even if it wasn't paid - but would it niggle away at you if you never asked? Or would it not bother you?

    If you decide to ask then think of a way that you feel comfortable doing this. eg. a direct question, a by the way question or an email even.

    Try not to end up in a situation where you agree to doing something and then afterwards feel angry or resentful - we've all been there.

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 6
  • Catherine Stobbs

    Actor

    I'd speak to someone in authority about it, who you feel you can chat to as a friend, and see what their opinion is. You could always perhaps suggest, maybe the same payment as your temping work, but perhaps you would get the rest of the day off or something?

    I guess it is kind of a cop out but I think it all depends, whether or not you think it is going to work in your favour. Better to be paid something, than nothing at all.

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 7
  • Jon Carver

    Actor

    I would definitely ask for payment. You are a temp, not a full time member of staff. As you are a temp though, the agency you work for may have a viewpoint. The other thing you could do is to utilise the following line "Thank's for the offer, could you call my agent though, all offers for work really should go via them"

    • 8th Apr 2011
    • 8
  • Forbes KB

    Actor

    Tricky one indeed but also a legal one!

    There will be a clause in the contract you have with the agency you temp through that expressly forbids doing any work for the clients they place you with within 12 months of your previous assignment. They may get a little bend out of shape if they found out that you voiced their website as it would breach this exclusivity clause.

    Tell your boss you are not allowed to contract acting work direct and to go through your acting agent for this gig. Brief you agent beforehand not to play hard-ball though or she may price you out of the job...mates rates!

    x

    • 9th Apr 2011
    • 9
  • Anne-Louise Woodcroft

    Actor

    Very tricky, but also very nice to be asked by them. In my opinion, as this company has been very flexible with you in the past, I may consider this as a favour back to them (if payment isn't mentioned), and maybe make a little joke of "I usually charge for this!" - then they are made aware of the fact, but not embarrassed. On the positive, you will end up with a good piece of showreel work which could prove lucrative in the future. I think this way, everyone is happy.

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 10
  • Farah Sardar

    Actor

    Thanks for your contribution anna.

    But if you really need to ask someone something never make it seem like a joke otherwise you won't be taken seriously.

    There's really nothing wrong with being specific and direct sometimes. Being assertive isn't being rude. x

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 11
  • Peter Halpin

    Actor

    I have to agree, making a joke of it isn't going to get anywhere. They'll probably laugh along, but only because they'll have saved themselves having to pay to get a job done. It certainly won't give the impression of professionalism or confidence, and once you've done it for free once, you'll be lucky to get paid for any future voicing for them & very low pay at best.

    Set your stall out firmly but politely and you'll be fine! :)

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 12
  • Nigel Peever

    Actor

    You might want to check your contract of service first, as you are already working for these people you might have already signed away any payments for this job beyond your usual x pounds an hour.

    For example in a contract with a theme park/bank/airline etc it might say that if they film the park for an advert and an actor/employee was to appear in the commercial/documentary/whatever that actor would already be a contracted artiste employed by the company and so no further payment is required.

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 13
  • Rob Talbot

    Actor

    I guess it's a question only you can answer. If they don't use you, how much will another VO artist cost them? (?Less than your standard hourly rate in the call centre?). If they are not going to pay market rates - because they are happy with non-actors doing it - then you've less bargaining room.

    How much is the "good will" worth you? If you become their "regualr voice" - you're less likely to be just a number to them. Meaning, you might get even more flexibility than you already have over auditions / other short-term jobs.

    It is indeed a balance.

    Presumably - sorry - it is in working hours so you are "being paid" an hourly rate if not an equity contract?

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 14
  • Peter Halpin

    Actor

    Forbes and Nigel make very good points - I guess that's why you titled this as you did!! Let us know how it pans out.

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 15
  • Peter Lloyd- Jones

    Actor

    If it was me, I would do it for free!.

    You say that they give you time off for jobs etc, I would see this as a way of recipricating their understanding about the "other hat that you wear".

    But Hey! That's me . . . .(just too Damm generous)

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 16
  • Marc Zammit

    Actor

    Hey Vicky

    The Thing with this kind of situation, you have to put a foot down and ask, just say to them is there any kind of payments. because it will be cheeky for them not to pay you, its basically a way of getting its a cheap way for them and free and saving money in there pockets, and its out of your time. because one thing i notice with work outside of what we do, they don't remember the good things we do at work, only the bad, and you have every right to turn them down, you dont owe them nothing, and they cant fire you for it, otherwise its unfair dismiss, the thing is when you are two soft and polite and nice, people try and take that for advantage, or you will feel rude to ask, but dont be afraid at all, i would personally ask them.

    • 10th Apr 2011
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  • Claire Dodin

    Actor

    what you need to say is:

    "Sure, I would love to do it!Thanks! What is your budget for it?"

    good luck!

    • 10th Apr 2011
    • 18
  • User Deleted

    This profile has been archived

    Thank you so much for taking the time to give me some advice. I will let you know what I decide to do, and how it goes!!

    • 11th Apr 2011
    • 19